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Author Topic: TAYLORVILLE Correctional Center  (Read 22715 times)
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« on: March 06, 2006, 09:50:42 AM »

Taylorville Correctional Center  


Lynn Dexheimer, Warden  

Facility Data

Taylorville Correctional Center
 Opened: November 1990
 *Operational Capacity: 1,221
 Minimum Security Adult Male
 *Current Population: 1,189
 Average Age: 37
 FY2010 Average Annual Cost Per Inmate: $19,235.00
 
*As of 5/31/2012. Reflects bed space capacity analysis as outlined in the July 1, 2012 Quarterly Report to the Legislature.
 
Visiting Hours

  

IDOC Visitation Rules and Information
 
Visitors to any correctional facility will be required to produce photo identification and verification of date of birth. Please be sure to bring 2 forms of identification with you; these would include a current photo ID such as a driver’s license, a state ID card, government ID card, military ID/driver’s license, or acceptable documentation of non-U.S. citizenship including a current Passport, or Visa, documentation must contain the visitor’s date of birth. Expired forms of identification will not be accepted. Visitors will also be required to provide vehicle information and other pertinent data, such as government identification, official credentials, attorney registration, and or law student certification.
 
Taylorville Correctional Center Visiting Rules and Procedures
 
General Population
 8:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. seven (7) days a week. Offenders are permitted seven (7) visits per month, with no more than three (3) on weekends or state holidays.  Visitors must arrive no later than 6:00p.m.
 
5 hour time limit on visits; visits may be terminated prior to the five hour time limit if overcrowding occurs.
 
Orientation Inmates cannot receive visitors from 8:30am - 4:00pm Monday through Wednesday
 
Segregation and Offenders in C-Grade Classification
 Segregation and inmates in C-Grade classification are allowed two, one hour no contact visits per calendar month. Visitors must arrive no later than 1:00p.m.  No weekend or state holiday visits permitted.
 
Note: Shift Change is at 3:00p.m.  Visitors are not allowed to come into reception area from 2:30p.m. to 3:15p.m.

Facility Address

Physical Address:
 1144 Illinois Route 29
 Taylorville, IL 62568
 
Business Mail:
Route 29 South
 P.O. Box 1000
 Taylorville, IL 62568  
 
Inmate Mail:
Inmate Name & IDOC#
 P.O. Box 1000
 Taylorville, IL 62568  
 
Phone: (217) 824-4004
 Fax: (217) 824-4042

Facility Information

Taylorville Correctional Center's primary mission is to incarcerate adult offenders assigned to the Taylorville Correctional Center in an environment that is safe, secure and humane for inmates and staff and provide quality programs and services designed to assist offenders in their reintegration to the community.
 
Taylorville Correctional Center is a Minimum Security Adult Male facility located on Illinois Route 29, 30 miles southeast of Springfield. The facility opened in 1990. In 1995, the facility was designated as a security threat group (STG)-free facility, housing offenders with no affiliations to an STG. Taylorville Correctional Center's experience has been that offenders who are STG-free readily respond to population management techniques and commit fewer rule infractions than those associated with STGs. Also important in managing the population is programs provided by the facility. These programs assist with population management and provide opportunities for inmates to improve their life and work skills to enhance their chance of success upon release.
 
Inmate Programs
 
Academic:
•ABE (Adult Basic Education)
•GED (General Education Development)

Vocational:
•Career Technology
•Culinary Arts
•Construction Occupations (Habitat for Humanity)
•Commercial Custodial
•Horticulture

Volunteer Services:
•Alcoholics Anonymous
•Narcotics Anonymous
•Project Storybook (Lutheran Social Services)

Other:
•Lifestyle Redirection (12-week program)
•Substance Abuse (Civigenics)
•Anger Management
•Self Esteem
•Sex Offender Program
•Library/Law Library
•Chaplaincy
•Leisure Time Activity
•Parenting
•Incarcerated Veterans Transition Program
•Group Therapy
•Stress Reduction
•Young Offender (12-week program)


http://www2.illinois.gov/idoc/facilities/Pages/taylorvillecorrectionalcenter.aspx
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« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2006, 04:06:11 PM »

 June 15, 2006
   

Taylorville Correctional Center reaches milestone—Walls built for its 100th Habitat for Humanity house
Partnership allows inmates to build housing components for Habitat for Humanity homes for low-income families

   Springfield – Taylorville Correctional Center reached a major milestone today by constructing walls for its 100th house for Habitat for Humanity.  The house will become the new home for a family in McLean County.
The program at Taylorville Correctional Center is a partnership between Building Homes: Rebuilding Lives, a program of Lutheran Social Services of Illinois (LSSI); Habitat for Humanity; the Illinois Department of Corrections (IDOC) and IDOC School District 428.  The program enables inmates in the construction trades class at Taylorville to build housing components for Habitat for Humanity homes for low-income families.  The class is provided through IDOC School District 428, which contracts with Lake Land College at Mattoon.

“Building walls for 100 Habitat for Humanity houses is most noteworthy in the history of the Taylorville Correctional Center,” said IDOC Director Roger E. Walker Jr.  “Since the inception of the center, its mission is to prepare inmates for their eventual release and for positive and successful lives by helping them develop teamwork, self-discipline, self-esteem and self-worth as individuals.  Programs, such as this one, are important factors in positive learning and rehabilitation.”
Walker also noted the importance of reentry management and the agency’s partnership with LSSI in the Building Homes: Rebuilding Lives Program.

“Reentry management is a major goal of Governor Rod R. Blagojevich and the Illinois Department of Corrections,” said Walker.  “The Building Homes: Rebuilding Lives Program serves as an important component in the reentry management of inmates and also brings hope and dignity to communities through the building of Habitat for Humanity homes.  Today inmates are given more opportunities for successful reentry into society than ever before through such rehabilitative programs and our commitment to reentry management.”

“The LSSI Building Homes: Rebuilding Lives Program fosters the philosophy of restorative justice by offering inmates the opportunity to give back to the community,” said Jane Otte, executive director of LSSI Prisoner and Family Ministry.  “In the process, inmates gain valuable trade skills and a sense of self-worth.  They see themselves as partners in a community building effort and as part of an international Christian housing movement.  Building Homes: Rebuilding Lives is a statewide collaboration.  Last year Building Homes: Rebuilding Lives partnered with 14 different prisons across the state.  Also last year at Taylorville Correctional Center, housing components for one of the homes went to Shreveport, La., where a family was displaced by the hurricanes.  This kind of partnership not only increases the production within the prisons, but also expands the giving opportunity for the incarcerated.  They become a part of the great store of people in the U.S. who are responding to the cry for help on the Gulf Coast.  Prisoners can give to people in need far beyond Illinois.  Their world view and their generous response grow at the same time, which helps to move them forward in a positive direction after their release from prison.”

“LSSI and Habitat for Humanity began their partnership at Taylorville Correctional Center in 1999 with six homes being built here the first year,” said Warden Greg Sims.  “Last year, the center built 20 homes for the program and this year the center has already built 10 homes, which ultimately has contributed to its 100th house built for Habitat for Humanity.”
David Sharp has served as the Lake Land College instructor for the construction trades class at Taylorville Correctional Center for the past four years.  Materials from the homes are purchased through LSSI and/or the local Habitat affiliate and delivered to the Taylorville facility by a local lumber company.  All interior and exterior walls are constructed at the facility and erected to ensure the components fit correctly.  The walls are marked, disassembled and loaded on a semi-trailer.  Illinois Correctional Industries Pana Warehouse typically arranges for the transportation.  The walls are then delivered to the appropriate Habitat organization where volunteers from the community reassemble and finish the home.
“The most rewarding part of this program is when families receiving homes that were built here come back and thank the class,” said Sims.  “The inmates feel good about being able to give back to society.  This program provides them with a feeling of accomplishment and purpose.  It truly is a win-win situation.  Through their efforts and teamwork, the inmates are demonstrating a desire to make positive changes in their lives while helping families in need.”
Throughout IDOC, there are many opportunities for offenders to give back to communities.  Details of these programs teach them invaluable lessons while increasing their self-esteem as they help people.
“The Governor and I are committed to enhancing the successful reentry of offenders into society through rehabilitative programs and services,” said Walker.  “Reaching out and helping those in communities that have helped and assisted them in many ways, offers countless rewards to everyone involved.  Such programs not only benefit our communities and help offenders return to society, but also serve as a valuable asset to the taxpayer.”

http://www.illinois.gov/PressReleases/ShowPressRelease.cfm?SubjectID=1&RecNum=4983
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« Reply #2 on: July 20, 2006, 08:16:43 AM »

It's a frame-up: But these inmates aren't complaining as they build homes for Habitat for Humanity   
By RON INGRAM - H&R Staff Writer


TAYLORVILLE - Habitat for Humanity programs throughout Illinois are benefiting from a training program for inmates at the minimum-security Taylorville Correctional Center.

Taylorville Inmates Building Houses

Eighteen inmates in each training class spend about nine months learning housing construction techniques by building components for Habitat houses, putting them together to make sure they fit properly and then disassembling the homes so they can be loaded on a flatbed trailer and shipped.

The class recently completed the 106th house built at the prison since the program began in 1999, an 1,100-square-foot structure with 2-by-6-inch exterior wall studs so the house can be heavily insulated and energy efficient.

The program is a partnership among Building Homes: Rebuilding Lives, a program of Lutheran Social Services of Illinois; Habitat for Humanity; the Illinois Department of Corrections; and the department's School District 428, which contracts with Lake Land College in Mattoon for an instructor.

The program fits well with the Taylorville Correctional Center's mission, said Roger Walker Jr. of Decatur, director of the Illinois Department of Corrections.

"Its mission is to prepare inmates for their eventual release and for positive and successful lives by helping them develop teamwork, self-discipline, self-esteem and self-worth as individuals," Walker said. "Programs such as this one are important factors in positive learning and rehabilitation."

Jane Otte, Lutheran Social Services of Illinois executive director, said the program offers inmates the opportunity to give back to the community.

Inmate Paul Piecuch measure to pr cut a piece of top plate for a wall on a framed house that inmates built at the Taylorville Correctional Center for Habitat for Humanity.
"In the process, inmates gain valuable trade skills and a sense of self-worth," Otte said. "They see themselves as partners in a community building effort and as part of an international Christian housing movement."

Building Homes: Rebuilding Lives is a statewide collaboration that last year involved 14 prisons statewide, Otte said.

David Sharp has been the program instructor for the past four years.

Inmates have to pass a college entrance exam of sorts by taking the Test of Adult Basic Education and achieving at least a score of 8 out of a possible 12, Sharp said. Inmates also must complete a mathematics program to get their certificate signifying they finished the course, he said.

"I've been a builder for 30 years," Sharp said. "The value of this program is our hands-on process. You can learn construction techniques out of a manual, but when it comes to building strong walls and a square house, you need hands-on experience."

The 1,100-square-foot house just completed took five men three days to construct, Sharp said. But if push came to shove, one of his crews could complete a house in one day, he said.

Between March 28 and July 14, the Taylorville class completed 16 homes and would like to have more to do, Sharp said.

"A Habitat affiliate sends us a preliminary drawing or a detailed design," Sharp said. "We sit down with a computer-assisted design program and redraw it to get exact specifications. The guys make a parts list and order the material. It's delivered, and we cut and assemble the house."

While most of the structures have been erected in Illinois, a few have gone to Missouri around St. Louis, a few were sent to Texas when the program first started and one was sent to Shreveport, La., last year for a family displaced by Hurricane Katrina.

With up to 300,000 new homes needed in the wake of last year's Gulf Coast hurricanes, Illinois correctional centers could help meet those needs, Sharp said. The state would like to expand the number of construction classes, he said.

"I'm learning a lot," said Gerald Urban, 40, from Grundy County, one of the current class of inmates at the Taylorville prison. "This is helping a lot of families. We've met three families who came here to pick up their houses. They're appreciative of what we are doing for them."

Urban said he was a chemical operator prior to getting into the prison system.

"Most of the time I worked indoors on a computer," Urban said. "This is harder work. When I get out, I'd like to hook up with a local Habitat group and volunteer if I don't actually go into construction. I've done this kind of work before, but not to this level."

Inmate Paul Piecuch, 45, from Elk Grove Village said working on the houses is like having a real job.

"You have to deal with the elements: the rain, the heat and the bugs," Piecuch said. "We work six or seven hours a day, and you have to do that in the real world."

Piecuch said he worked construction part time and was a press operator full time "on the outside." He said he enjoys the class and meeting some of the people whose homes he is helping to build, which included one man in the military who was about to be shipped to Iraq.

"People who don't enjoy the class drop it right away," Piecuch said.

Sharp said there is a waiting list to get into the class, and inmates rarely drop out.

"But when they do, it's because the work is too hard," he said.

http://www.herald-review.com/articles/2006/07/20/news/local_news/1016510.txt
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Do not value the "things" you have in your life - value "who" you have in your life....



“Instead of thinking about what you're missing, try thinking about what you have that everyone else is missing.”
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« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2008, 09:17:25 PM »


I know I dont post much on here so sorry for always coming  just for answers to my questions or so it seems!!!
But I have been dealing with only Robinson C.C. for the last 4 years & now that we are about 11 months short of my man coming home he has put in for a transfer to Taylorville which will  be great because thats only 88 miles from home unlike Robinson being 150 miles oneway but I was wondering if someone that has had expierence visiting there could tell me alittle about it like do they still take pictures there? how long the visits are? how much you can put on there vending cards etc??
I would really appreciate all the information I can get to try and prepare myself just in case..
thanks in advance
Brandy
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« Reply #4 on: November 14, 2008, 10:53:57 PM »

Taylorville is a decent place Babygurl......as far as facilities go........
Your new travel distance will be awesome.......
No Pictures
Limit on Vending card.....but I don't recall how much maybe $25 or $30
5 visits per month
no cells dorm rooms
Phones in dorms turned off at 9 PM---you have to sign up to use the phone
No time limit on visits unless the visit room is full, which can happen on weekends especially at the beginning of the month.  But if you get there late AM you should be OK, sometimes the earlier arrivals are the ones that end up getting terminated....several vending machines childrens area and two microwaves.
MOST guards are pretty nice, most its all business, but a few are very nice.
They usually do CAR CHECKS once a month on Saturdays.....takes lots of times, and the phones get shut down....
State police, dogs, and CO's---Keep your car CLEAN....makes it easier......
Can only take in ID, coat, keys
Photo ID and SS # on first visit
Good Luck...let us know how your experience is.
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« Reply #5 on: November 16, 2008, 12:48:14 PM »

thanks so much for the information!! I just like to know everything about a place before I go to it lol

Brandy
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« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2009, 04:56:19 PM »

my husband got sent to Taylorville today and it is way south from where we live so we will not be able to visit and may not be able to pick him up when he is released.  What happens if there is no one to pick him up when released?
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« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2009, 05:57:23 PM »

my husband got sent to Taylorville today and it is way south from where we live so we will not be able to visit and may not be able to pick him up when he is released.  What happens if there is no one to pick him up when released?

He will be taken to the bus or train station and given money for the ride home.   
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“Instead of thinking about what you're missing, try thinking about what you have that everyone else is missing.”
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« Reply #8 on: April 29, 2009, 09:06:37 AM »

My husband is in Taylorville and my daughter was admitted into the hospital today.  Is there a way to get a hold of my husband to let him know the status of my daughter?  He only has about 6 weeks left.
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« Reply #9 on: April 29, 2009, 09:34:20 AM »

witted have you tried reaching his counselor? It may not be instantaneous but the counselor should notify him. Tell the counselor it is an urgent medical condition about his daughter.
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« Reply #10 on: April 29, 2009, 10:58:28 AM »

Thank you.  I will do that.  I wasn't sure who I was supposed to contact.
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« Reply #11 on: March 03, 2010, 08:47:18 PM »

I'm looking for any information about Taylorville from someone who has actually been there or has someone there, please
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« Reply #12 on: March 30, 2010, 09:06:50 PM »

My boyfriend is in Taylorville. I have visited a few times now and it is not bad at all. Better then most places for sure
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« Reply #13 on: November 03, 2010, 10:14:16 AM »

My husband is in there. Had our first visit last Sunday. It was not bad at all. You need two ID's (driver's licence and a student ID worked for me). $40 limit on a vending card - you do not need that much money for one visit. I think there's no-skirt policy, they made me to change my leggins to jeans (thank God I took them with me just in case!!).
T-mobile does not work in Taylorville area, I did not have any reception until I got back on the interstate.
My husband said Taylorvile is a gang-free prison, that's why he's been transfered there (because he asked for it actually).
About spending time there... Well, I think it's going to be not that easy for him. He says hardly anybody talks to him just because he is Russian (well, what are you gonna do about it?). But in general it is not that bad. They have a gym, he got himself a small TV, I will sent him books and he promissed me he will try to get classes and some job.
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« Reply #14 on: November 03, 2010, 10:20:28 AM »

Hi Ira - Welcome to IPT - my son is in Taylorville.  I would be happy to answer any questions you have about Taylorville.
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« Reply #15 on: November 03, 2010, 01:20:14 PM »

Hi - There .  I am so hoping someone can help me too.  I just got word my L/O will be transferred from Stateville Reception to Taylorville. I am looking for directions because I am having a hard time mapping it from what iis on the IL DOC site.  Also looking for any an all info about it.  I am from the east so I want to have all the ins and outs before I plan a visit.  Thank you everyone is so helpful here it is a blessing. 
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« Reply #16 on: November 04, 2010, 10:25:42 AM »

I have a question about dress-code. What is not allowed? Don't want to drive all the way there to find out that I can not be wearing that particular type of jeans, for example. Or a skirt.
Also about the books. Do they have to be new? I would like to send him his favourite book, but there is no way I can find it in a store...


Chase - I could not find the exact address for the prison, too. Google gave me directions to the library (don't know why). But I figured that all I need is to get to Taylorville, and ask at the firs gas tation for further directions. Did not need to do that - there was a sign on the road for Correctional Center.
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« Reply #17 on: November 04, 2010, 11:24:18 AM »

Most prisons do not require that books be brand new. You can call the prison and ask to speak with someone in the mailroom for specifics.

The joke on IPT is to dress as a nun! LOL Basically, don't wear anything that shows too much skin (skirts down to your knees, t-shirt sleeves or longer, pants without holes, no cleavage). Some places have a problem with leggings, so regular pants are a safer bet.
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« Reply #18 on: November 04, 2010, 03:28:28 PM »

Taylorville is pretty laid back once they get to know you.  One thing that I learned was that you cannot have a hood on any top or sweater.  If you wear a white top or sweater, wear a top under it too.
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« Reply #19 on: December 11, 2010, 02:14:51 PM »

 cc Just got back from my 3  day, all day visits with my honey.  It was out Christmas with each other.  It was so good to see him and how good he looks and know he is OK but also very very hard to leave knowing it will be months before I am able to go back.  Makes me so sad. wc17  Anyway most of the CO's seem pretty laid back and was great to be able to give huge hugs and kisses, hold hands all day long and sneak in a few more kisses here and there.  Games and cards to play.  Met a few of the guys in the same house as my LO and was able to bring back a commissary list.  Hopefully I can figure out how to get it posted. 
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