• March 24, 2019, 03:07:21 PM

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Author Topic: IDOC Director blames IL lawmakers for lack of spending on prison books  (Read 166 times)

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Offline kristyski1

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 Itís always someone elseís fault.... 🙄

Offline Nemdf

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We can send books from the outside.  Personally, I would rather that they be spending money on decent food, if there is a choice to be made between books and food. 

Offline kristyski1

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I really donít think itís out of line to expect that they both staff/supply programs and provide adequate food. It should never be an either/or compromise. The conditions our corrections system propagates is disgusting. When you canít/wonít even provide basic necessities such as adequate food, water, and clothing, thereís a problem. I donít expect that incarceration be pleasant, but what the State of Illinois is doing is inhumane.  In my mind, corrections should be focused on correcting behaviors. Counseling, programs to educate and prevent recidivism, mental health care, connections to resources outside of the institution to help with job skills, anger management, and drug addiction counseling should be priorities. Connecting and healing family relationships, giving purpose and teaching our men and women how to be productive members of society should be the priority. These men and women didnít stop being human because they landed in an institution. I would bet my hat if you did a study on trauma in childhood, 99% of those who are incarcerated, grew up dealing with incredible levels of trauma. We are looking at a group of broken adults who have been broken most of their lives. Asking for them to come out after an incarceration where they were not supported inside, had any connection to positive resources outside severed for a long period of time, and expecting that theyíll never want to go back to prison because itís uncomfortable is ludicrous.  They didnít have the skills before incarceration to survive, and they certainly donít have them afterwards when theyíve been separated from society and given no chance to address what got them there in the first place.  Do I believe that every person can be rehabilitated?  No.  I think there are some very broken people who do not have any humanity left in them.  But, thatís a bigger issue than even incarceration can fix.  Only God can address someone who is that broken.   Illinois has a huge problem with overpopulated prisons. In 2018, we incarcerated more people per capita in Illinois than the countries of Cuba, Rwanda, and Iran.  (https://www.prisonpolicy.org/global/2018.html) The Bureau of Justice Statistics did a study starting in 2005. They followed offenders released in 2005 for nine years. In that 9-year study 83% of prisoners released in 2005 had been re-arrested.  (https://www.bjs.gov/index.cfm?ty=pbdetail&iid=6266)   Itís not working.  As far as sending books from the outside, theyíre counting on families of loved ones to do that.  Then, they donít have to pay for them.  I wonít be surprised to see them charge for classes like culinary arts, Adult Basic Education, GED, and custodial maintenance in the future.  Not providing food, books etc. is a scam.  Have you stopped to consider how much money they make from the families of each individual who is incarcerated?  Think about the amount of money it costs for things like socks, boots, telephone calls, visiting, hygiene, and laundry.  How much is it costing each company/business in lost productivity, when someone they employ  has an incarcerated loved one?  The average cost of a single episode of recidivism in Illinois costs $118,746. (http://www.icjia.state.il.us/spac/pdf/Illinois_Results_First_1015.pdf)   It seems to me, if you want to fix the State of Illinois, maybe a smart investment might be in actually reducing the recidivism rates and using the saved money to offer each person in this state better mental health services, better training and job skills through books, adequate health care and mental health care so broken adults can heal, better food so they can heal their bodies,  and better family services to prevent poverty, abuse and trauma in childhood.  Sorry for the long post.  This is something Iím very passionate about. 

Offline Martha

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I agree with you kristyski1 100%! 

Offline Meami

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Very well said Kristy!