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Author Topic: Rauner: Ok To Spend Now For Criminal Justice Reform  (Read 5857 times)

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Offline Forevermah

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Rauner: Ok To Spend Now For Criminal Justice Reform
« on: January 15, 2016, 06:58:32 AM »


January 14. 2016 11:57

Rauner: OK to spend now for criminal justice reform



Gov. Bruce Rauner on Thursday called for short-term spending to achieve long-term reforms aimed at reducing Illinois' prison population by 25 percent in the next 10 years.

Rauner spoke in Springfield at a meeting of the Illinois State Commission on Criminal Justice and Sentencing Reform, where he commended the efforts of the group he created last year to achieve that goal.

Some commission members, however, questioned the wisdom of imposing additional financial burdens on an already-strapped corrections system.

“I think everyone’s big concern is, as we do this, some of these things are going to require resources, and resources means money, and I think that’s just a point of anxiety,” said Brendan Kelley, St. Clair County state’s attorney.”

Rauner responded that the state must be willing to spend in the short term for long-term benefits.

“There’s no question that sometimes to save money in the long run requires spending more money in the short run, and in Illinois, we haven’t been doing that for years,” Rauner said. “We’ve always taken the short-run decision, what cuts costs now and not what saves significant resources over a longer term. We’ve got to change that mindset.”

The governor added that the goal is to move the corrections system away from simply housing offenders and keeping them away from the public, and to focus on effective rehabilitation, such as substance abuse training, mental health treatment and counseling to ensure those offenders don’t make the same mistakes again.

“If we can implement (the commission’s) recommendations, I firmly believe that we can have the people of Illinois safer,” Rauner said. “I believe we can save taxpayer money, and most importantly, I believe we can help those who made mistakes lead productive lives and come back as productive, full citizens who are enhancing the quality of life for everyone in all of our communities around Illinois.”

The commission, which has been meeting about once a month since its creation last February, on Thursday discussed ways to control the number of minority youth who come into contact with the juvenile justice system. Rauner encouraged them not to shy away from emotionally charged racial issues that may be contributing to a disproportionate number of minorities and ethnic groups being incarcerated at a young age.

“I don’t think there’s any question that there is bias within the system,” Rauner said. “The system is built of human beings, and human beings have biases.”

One of the recommendations proposed by the commission is to have law enforcement in Illinois participate in the National Incident Based Reporting System, which requires police agencies to collect and report detailed information about crime incidents, arrests and clearances, including the demographic information of victims and offenders.

Other proposals include the collection and publication of data from probation departments about race and ethnicity, a requirement for state lawmakers to include racial- and ethnic-impact notes to estimate the effect of proposed criminal justice legislation, and an annual assessment from the Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority of the state justice system’s impact on race and ethnicity.


“We’ve got to become much more evidence-based and data-based, so let’s measure what we’re doing and hold ourselves to outcomes. Let’s not just do what sounds good,” Rauner said. “It’s hard to manage what you don’t measure, and I applaud (the commission’s) focus on evidence-based and data-based work and holding the programs and efforts to a rigorous level of accountability.”

In the most recent quarterly report submitted by the Illinois Department of Corrections in October, the state's prison population was reported at 47,000, down from the 47,483 reported in May. However, a majority of facilities remain overcrowded, with some holding over 200 percent of their designed capacity.

http://www.sj-r.com/article/20160114/NEWS/160119762
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Offline Forevermah

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Re: Rauner: Ok To Spend Now For Criminal Justice Reform
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2016, 07:01:40 AM »
Criminal Justice
Criminal justice commission issues recommendations


SPRINGFIELD — A commission working on ways to reduce Illinois' prison population by 25 percent over the next decade has issued its first set of recommendations to Gov. Bruce Rauner.

Among the 14 recommendations in its initial report are improving the collection and sharing of data among units of government, giving judges more discretion to give probation in certain lower-level felony cases, and setting up a way to place terminally ill or incapacitated prisoners in home confinement or medical facilities.

The Illinois State Commission on Criminal Justice and Sentencing Reform, which the first-term Republican governor created last year during his first month in office, met Wednesday in Springfield. Rauner made a brief appearance at the meeting to thank the group for its recommendations and encourage panel members to continue their work.

"This is critically important work," Rauner said. "This is not partisan work. This is good government work, and this is human service work. This is helping the people of Illinois, all the people of Illinois.

"Everybody makes mistakes," he said. "Some people make more serious mistakes than others, but everybody deserves a second chance."

The report groups recommendations under four broader goals: ensuring the validity of sentencing and programming, reducing prison admissions, reducing the length of prison stays, and reducing recidivism by increasing the chances of successful re-entry into society.

Some would require approval from the General Assembly, but others could be implemented through administrative action at departments the governor controls.

For example, said Rodger Heaton, the commission's chairman and a former federal prosecutor, improving programs dealing with mental health, substance abuse and other issues in the prison system could be done through reallocating money within the Department of Corrections. But it could also require additional funding, which the Legislature would have to appropriate.

Heaton said the group is charging forward with its work despite the state's budget standoff, now in its seventh month.

"My hope is that this commission and its recommendations are treated separately from what's going on with the budget issues," said state Rep. Scott Drury, D-Highwood, noting the group includes lawmakers from both parties and both chambers.

He said the hope is to find consensus on the recommendations and bring them up for votes in the House and Senate, but it might be difficult to convince some lawmakers to vote on potentially controversial issues in an election year.

The commission will meet in Feb. 18 in Chicago and plans to issue the second part of its recommendations later this year.




http://www.pantagraph.com/news/state-and-regional/illinois/government-and-politics/criminal-justice-commission-issues-recommendations/article_735fe3db-b5c1-527c-b9e1-723a6ae87d6f.html
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Offline trauma4us

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Re: Rauner: Ok To Spend Now For Criminal Justice Reform
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2016, 09:13:58 AM »
I sure hope they do make strides Mah.  I would have liked to have gone to Springfield but I work two jobs so without advance notice, thats not possible - ugh.  I wish they would publish in advance a list of meetings. I live downstate but only about an 1.5 hours from Springfield so would like to go to some of their meetings.

Offline smme7

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Re: Rauner: Ok To Spend Now For Criminal Justice Reform
« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2016, 10:15:35 AM »
I hope they do, too. Our system is very sad and messed up. If they don't fix it things can't get better. 
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Offline msoptimistic

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Re: Rauner: Ok To Spend Now For Criminal Justice Reform
« Reply #4 on: January 23, 2016, 05:50:50 PM »
http://www.icjia.org/cjreform2015/about/meetings.html

Check this link it was posted on a different discussion. If you go to the home page. They list all upcoming meetings.

Offline Lu

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Re: Rauner: Ok To Spend Now For Criminal Justice Reform
« Reply #5 on: January 23, 2016, 10:57:56 PM »
My son just moved to Centralia.   This week they announced that they would be discontinuing the vocational training programs due to budget cuts!   One of the main ways to help inmates rehabilitate.   I don't understand their reasoning.  These programs were already in place in the prisons and helping inmates to get ready for release and hopefully be productive in the outside world.  The committees don't seem to be very practical in their assessments. More bureaucratic slowdowns and senseless actions.   Any thoughts?

Offline Gizgirl2

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Re: Rauner: Ok To Spend Now For Criminal Justice Reform
« Reply #6 on: January 24, 2016, 07:10:08 AM »
My son just moved to Centralia.   This week they announced that they would be discontinuing the vocational training programs due to budget cuts!   One of the main ways to help inmates rehabilitate.   I don't understand their reasoning.  These programs were already in place in the prisons and helping inmates to get ready for release and hopefully be productive in the outside world.  The committees don't seem to be very practical in their assessments. More bureaucratic slowdowns and senseless actions.   Any thoughts?

I agree with you that they need these programs. It has nothing to do with the committee though. This is all due to lack of budget from the Governor and the Legislature. Hopefully when/if a budget gets put into place all the programs will be put back in to place.

Offline cem31

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Re: Rauner: Ok To Spend Now For Criminal Justice Reform
« Reply #7 on: January 24, 2016, 11:09:06 AM »
I just read thru the recommendations, and at first glance they seem promising, but reading further it appears that they are still focused on more low level crimes (in my opinion). One that I was excited (then disappointed) to read was #8, that all inmates should be eligible for sentencing credits. At the start it goes on to say:

 "Allowing  inmates  to  receive sentence  credit  for  successfully  completing  prison programs  has a  long  history  in  Illinois,  and  is  a  practice  followed  in  a  majority  of  other  states.   Illinois  inmates now  receive  credit  for  completing  full-time  substance  abuse  programs,  correctional  industry assignments,  educational  programs, behavior  modification programs, life  skills  courses, and reentry planning provided by the Department of Corrections. There  are,  however,  some inmates  who  are categorically  ineligible for  these credits.  Offenders  who  have committed  certain  types  of  offenses,  for  example,  may  not  receive  credit  for participating  in  programming. Inmates  who have  previously  served more  than one  prison sentence  are  also ineligible, as  are  those  who have  previously  received programming  credit  and were later convicted of a felony."

...fantastic, that would be welcome news to many!! But reading further it goes on to say:

"The legislature  should  amend  the  relevant statutes  to remove  the  restrictions  on those who are  eligible  to receive  programming  credit  under  730  ILCS  §5/3-6-3(a)(4), ***other than those  offenders  who  are precluded  from  receiving  these  credits because they committed an offense specified in that subsection***."

...wait, what?? Call me crazy but isn't that last part just repeating the same thing that was already in the ststute?? How is it recommending anything different if you're still excluding Class X and other more serious crimes??

I'm hoping someone here wil tell me that I'm just reading that wrong and that the recommendation really is in favor of "ALL inmates" like they first led to believe. In my opinion not ALL inmates should be placed under a blanket statute when it comes to possible early release or earning credit, if the inmate has stayed out of trouble, been productive since they've been in, and have shown that they are ready to be reintroduced to society then give them that chance after serving half or so of the sentence, let them earn some credits in hopes of coming home early, or give them electronic detention to show their worthiness, if they mess up then put them back in prison and don't give them that chance again! Evaluate them on an individual basis, not by a group, catagory or number, because not all who are in prison are there for something they themselves did.

Offline Forevermah

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Re: Rauner: Ok To Spend Now For Criminal Justice Reform
« Reply #8 on: January 24, 2016, 12:01:47 PM »
The link to

Illinois State Commission on Criminal Justice and Sentencing Reform Final Report: Part 1



http://www.icjia.org/cjreform2015/pdf/CJSR%20Final%20Report%20Part%20I%201-4-2016.pdf


You will notice on page 4, #8, in response the some Class X convictions receiving credit, the report as to whether Truth in Sentencing Convictions would get these credits, is not yet completed.

Interesting read.

Also, here is the link to their January meeting, at which they were suppose to talk more about enhanced sentence credits for Class X offenders, no minutes available on that meeting yet:

http://www.icjia.org/cjreform2015/pdf/Commission%201-14-16%20Agenda%20%282%29.pdf


November Meeting Minutes:

http://www.icjia.org/cjreform2015//pdf/November%2020%202015%20-%20Commission%20-%20Reforms%20Meeting.pdf



These are all recommendations and IF legislation is brought forward to implement any of this it could take YEARS, before it all goes into effect.  There could lots of changes to these suggestions too, time will tell.
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Offline Forevermah

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Re: Rauner: Ok To Spend Now For Criminal Justice Reform
« Reply #9 on: January 25, 2016, 10:42:33 AM »
 Justice, prison reforms a chance for compromise

    Ivan Moreno ASSOCIATED PRESS 3 hrs ago

SPRINGFIELD — Gov. Bruce Rauner wants to reduce the number of inmates in Illinois' overcrowded prison system over the next decade — and he's willing to devote money to do so at a time when he's urging lawmakers to be prudent with spending in other areas.

Reforming the state's criminal justice system presents the first-term Republican governor with a rare opportunity to find agreement with legislators as he prepares to deliver his second State of the State address Wednesday. Rauner's first year in office has been defined by a budget stalemate — now in its seventh month — with Democrats who control the Legislature.

But reforming the criminal justice system and shifting more attention to rehabilitating offenders rather than imprisoning them is an issue that's appealing to both parties here and around the country.

"Even though there's a lot of gridlock right now, you're seeing a real strong bipartisan agreement that this is something that Illinois has to do," said John Maki, executive director of Illinois' Criminal Justice Information Authority, an organization that administers federal public safety grants and researches criminal justice trends.

Maki is part of a 28-member group convened by Rauner last year with the goal of reducing Illinois' prison population by 25 percent by 2025. Here's a look at the group's work and some of the 14 recommendations they've presented the governor.

Illinois' prison population has grown from 6,000 in 1974 to about 49,000 presently. That's an increase of more than 500 percent for a system designed to house 32,000 inmates. Annually, it costs more than $22,000 on average to incarcerate someone and the state spends $1.3 billion per year on prisons.

Rauner told commission members Jan. 14 that programs that reduce recidivism and help inmates acclimate back into society is a worthy investment now to save money in the future. It's a popular idea among other states with Republican leadership, such as Georgia and Kansas, which have recently taken measures to reduce their prison population.

Some Democrats also have long expressed interest in reforming states' criminal justice systems, arguing that minorities are often disproportionately represented in prisons, sometimes as a result of low-level drug offenses.

"I was glad to hear (Rauner) say it," said Rep. Elgie Sims, a Chicago Democrat on the commission. "And I hope that the investment and the desire to get things done really happen."

Since the commission started meeting in March, its focus has been to study possible changes to sentencing laws, alternatives to incarceration and effective rehabilitation programs.

Among the group's recommendations:

•Allow judges discretion to sentence someone to probation for low-level offenses, like residential burglary or some drug crimes.

•Authorize and encourage the Department of Corrections to use alternatives to prison for those facing a sentence of less than a year.

•Use electronic monitoring instead of prison for those with short sentences.

•Eliminate unnecessary restrictions for convicts looking to obtain professional licenses for jobs.

•Improve prison rehabilitation programs, with a focus on substance abuse and cognitive behavioral therapy.

"If we can implement your recommendations, I firmly believe that we can have the people of Illinois safer, I believe that we can save taxpayer money, and most importantly I believe we can help those who've made mistakes lead productive lives," Rauner told the group.

It's not yet known how much rehabilitation programs would cost the state, or how the state would cover the price tag. But commission members say the savings from reducing the prison population can help.

Many of the first set of recommendations can be implemented without legislative approval. But the group is currently working on more recommendations, due sometime this spring, that will require legislation. Some of the topics include possible changes to sentences without the possibility of parole and modifications to sentences for drug offenses.

Those may require tough votes for lawmakers, commission members said.

"It can be seen as being soft on crime when in reality we're being smart on crime," said Rep. Scott Drury, a Democrat from Highwood.

Brendan Kelly, the state's attorney in St. Clair County and another member of the commission, said its goals are laudable but added there must be caution not to do away with laws that have improved public safety, like mandatory minimums for violent crimes.

"That's the trick. Public safety has to be paramount," he said.

http://www.pantagraph.com/news/local/crime-and-courts/justice-prison-reforms-a-chance-for-compromise/article_5a4306b8-454a-5055-9cd9-4c85e8aec853.html
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Offline Lu

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Re: Rauner: Ok To Spend Now For Criminal Justice Reform
« Reply #10 on: January 25, 2016, 08:37:18 PM »
So getting rid of most vocational training programs fits into their plans?  This is very hurtful to inmates and certainly doesn't help prepare them for release.   They could reduce the number of low level inmates and use the money saved to help rehabilitate/education those that need to serve more time.   A win/win for almost everyone.

Offline trauma4us

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Re: Rauner: Ok To Spend Now For Criminal Justice Reform
« Reply #11 on: January 26, 2016, 07:16:21 AM »
Lu - I agree.  My son is in on a Class X violent offense. He sits on his bunk for the past 2+ years doing NOTHING!!!!  He already has his GED and some college.  He is on the list for a JOB and SCHOOL but it will be a 3-4 YEAR wait before his name even comes up.  

Yes, he will be released back in society but with no job skills, having gained weight, with increased depression, etc...

And...all of this for one night of alcohol-fueled stupidity!!!! (His first and only offense).  

Offline jts

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Re: Rauner: Ok To Spend Now For Criminal Justice Reform
« Reply #12 on: January 11, 2017, 09:17:58 AM »
Not sure if this is in the right place but I'm sure someone with more knowledge than me will move it if it's not. The commission on criminal justice and sentencing has posted their final report. Here is the link:
http://www.icjia.org/cjreform2015/

Offline willied

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Re: Rauner: Ok To Spend Now For Criminal Justice Reform
« Reply #13 on: June 11, 2017, 08:16:47 PM »
IPT re HB2882
     It is encouraging to see IPT once again being used to promote an inmate concern – loosening the counterproductive Truth In Sentencing (TIS) restrictions.  Another bill – HB3355 by Rep. Elgie Sims  is very similar to HB2882 – changing 4.5 days to 8.5 days of credit.  Unfortunately both bills STOP SHORT OF MUCH NEEDED RELIEF.  They specifically prohibit retro-active accounting.  If credits were issued retro-actively, inmates could start being released quickly, and the state would literally be saving millions of dollars.
     PLEASE continue to write, call, or e-mail these representatives, other (your) legislators, even Gov. Rauner.  BUT, ask that they amend these bills to MAKE CREDITS EARNED RETRO- ACTIVE.
     Wouldn’t we all like to have our friends, family, and loved ones get a break and be released ‘early’?

willied                             willied

Offline ashleysiek

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Re: Rauner: Ok To Spend Now For Criminal Justice Reform
« Reply #14 on: June 11, 2017, 10:52:17 PM »
Willied, does the sb1722 that is about to pass have any ties to the Tis reform?

Offline Forevermah

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Re: Rauner: Ok To Spend Now For Criminal Justice Reform
« Reply #15 on: June 12, 2017, 06:29:15 AM »
IPT re HB2882
     It is encouraging to see IPT once again being used to promote an inmate concern – loosening the counterproductive Truth In Sentencing (TIS) restrictions.  Another bill – HB3355 by Rep. Elgie Sims  is very similar to HB2882 – changing 4.5 days to 8.5 days of credit.  Unfortunately both bills STOP SHORT OF MUCH NEEDED RELIEF.  They specifically prohibit retro-active accounting.  If credits were issued retro-actively, inmates could start being released quickly, and the state would literally be saving millions of dollars.
     PLEASE continue to write, call, or e-mail these representatives, other (your) legislators, even Gov. Rauner.  BUT, ask that they amend these bills to MAKE CREDITS EARNED RETRO- ACTIVE.
     Wouldn’t we all like to have our friends, family, and loved ones get a break and be released ‘early’?

willied                             willied


Neither of those bills made it out of session this time, so everyone will have to wait to see if anything new is proposed when they start up again in the fall.


This is the synopsis of HB3355..

Synopsis As Introduced
Amends the Unified Code of Corrections. Provides that in imposing a sentence for a Class 3 or 4 felony, other than a violent crime as defined in the Rights of Crime Victims and Witnesses Act, the court shall determine and indicate in the sentencing order whether the defendant has 4 or more or fewer than 4 months remaining on his or her sentence accounting for time served. Provides that an offender sentenced to a term of imprisonment for a Class 3 or 4 felony, other than a violent crime as defined in the Rights of Crime Victims and Witnesses Act, in which the sentencing order indicates that the offender has less than 4 months remaining on his or her sentence accounting for time served may not be confined in the penitentiary system of the Department of Corrections but may be assigned to electronic home detention, an adult transition center, or another facility or program within the Department of Corrections. Effective January 1, 2019.
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Offline Forevermah

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Re: Rauner: Ok To Spend Now For Criminal Justice Reform
« Reply #16 on: June 12, 2017, 06:38:07 AM »
Willied, does the sb1722 that is about to pass have any ties to the Tis reform?
Willied, does the sb1722 that is about to pass have any ties to the Tis reform?

SB1722 is going to extend the time in prison for second time gun offenders, not lessen times for TIS offenses.  It also enhances penalties for where drugs are sold around schools and public housing.


read the synopsis of what changes:

Replaces everything after the enacting clause. Amends the Criminal Identification Act. Provides that the sentencing information furnished to the Department of State Police shall include statutory citations to the relevant sentencing provision. Amends the Cannabis Control Act, the Illinois Controlled Substances Act, and the Methamphetamine Control and Community Protection Act. Eliminates the enhanced penalties for illegal drug deliveries in public housing facilities or on the grounds of those facilities. Reduces from within 1,000 feet to within 500 feet, the enhanced penalties for delivering illegal drugs in protected places. Provides that the enhanced penalties for delivering illegal drugs in schools only apply if the violation occurs at the time of the violation persons under the age of 18 are present, the offense is committed during school hours, or the offense is committed at times when persons under the age of 18 are reasonably expected to be present in the school, in the conveyance, or on the real property, such as when after-school activities are occurring. Amends the Unified Code of Corrections. Provides that on or after the effective date of the amendatory Act, when a person is convicted of unlawful use or possession of a weapon by a felon, when the weapon is a firearm, or aggravated unlawful use of a weapon, when the weapon is a firearm, after being previously convicted of a qualifying predicate offense the person shall be subject to certain sentencing guidelines. Defines "qualifying predicate offense". Provides that when a person is convicted of unlawful use or possession of a weapon by a felon, when the weapon is a firearm, and that person has been previously convicted of a qualifying predicate offense, the person shall be sentenced to a term of imprisonment within the sentencing range of not less than 7 years and not more than 14 years, unless the court finds that a departure from the sentencing guidelines is warranted. Provides that when a person is convicted of aggravated unlawful use of a weapon, when the weapon is a firearm, and that person has been previously convicted of a qualifying predicate offense, the person shall be sentenced to a term of imprisonment within the sentencing range of not less than 6 years and not more than 7 years, unless the court finds that a departure from the sentencing guidelines is warranted. Provides that in deciding whether to depart from the sentencing guideline ranges, the court shall consider certain specified factors. Provides that when departing from the sentencing guidelines, the court shall specify on the record, the particular evidence, information, factor or factors, or other reasons that led to the departure from the sentencing guidelines. Provides that the sentencing order shall be filed with the clerk of the court and shall be a public record. Makes changes in eligibility for program credits. Provides that the Illinois Sentencing Policy Advisory Council shall study and conduct a thorough analysis of the new sentencing provisions. Provides that the Sentencing Policy Advisory Council shall provide annual reports to the Governor and General Assembly, including the total number of persons sentenced under the new provisions, the total number of departures from sentences under the provisions, and an analysis of trends in sentencing and sentencing departures. Provides that on or before December 31, 2022, the Sentencing Policy Advisory Council shall provide a report to the Governor and General Assembly on the effectiveness of sentencing under the new provisions, including recommendations on whether the new sentencing provisions should be adjusted or continued. Amends the Criminal Code of 2012 to make conforming changes and changes the penalties for burglary.



Replaces everything after the enacting clause. Amends the Criminal Identification Act. Provides that the sentencing information furnished to the Department of State Police shall include statutory citations to the relevant sentencing provision. Amends the Cannabis Control Act, the Illinois Controlled Substances Act, and the Methamphetamine Control and Community Protection Act. Eliminates the enhanced penalties for illegal drug deliveries in public housing facilities or on the grounds of those facilities. Reduces from within 1,000 feet to within 500 feet, the enhanced penalties for delivering illegal drugs in protected places. Provides that the enhanced penalties for delivering illegal drugs in schools only apply if the violation occurs at the time of the violation persons under the age of 18 are present, the offense is committed during school hours, or the offense is committed at times when persons under the age of 18 are reasonably expected to be present in the school, in the conveyance, or on the real property, such as when after-school activities are occurring. Amends the Unified Code of Corrections. Provides that on or after the effective date of the amendatory Act, when a person is convicted of unlawful use or possession of a weapon by a felon, when the weapon is a firearm, or aggravated unlawful use of a weapon, when the weapon is a firearm, after being previously convicted of a qualifying predicate offense the person shall be subject to certain sentencing guidelines. Defines "qualifying predicate offense". Provides that when a person is convicted of unlawful use or possession of a weapon by a felon, when the weapon is a firearm, and that person has been previously convicted of a qualifying predicate offense, the person shall be sentenced to a term of imprisonment within the sentencing range of not less than 7 years and not more than 14 years, unless the court finds that a departure from the sentencing guidelines is warranted. Provides that when a person is convicted of aggravated unlawful use of a weapon, when the weapon is a firearm, and that person has been previously convicted of a qualifying predicate offense, the person shall be sentenced to a term of imprisonment within the sentencing range of not less than 6 years and not more than 7 years, unless the court finds that a departure from the sentencing guidelines is warranted. Provides that in deciding whether to depart from the sentencing guideline ranges, the court shall consider certain specified factors. Provides that when departing from the sentencing guidelines, the court shall specify on the record, the particular evidence, information, factor or factors, or other reasons that led to the departure from the sentencing guidelines. Provides that the sentencing order shall be filed with the clerk of the court and shall be a public record. Makes changes in eligibility for program credits. Provides that the Illinois Sentencing Policy Advisory Council shall study and conduct a thorough analysis of the new sentencing provisions. Provides that the Sentencing Policy Advisory Council shall provide annual reports to the Governor and General Assembly, including the total number of persons sentenced under the new provisions, the total number of departures from sentences under the provisions, and an analysis of trends in sentencing and sentencing departures. Provides that on or before December 31, 2022, the Sentencing Policy Advisory Council shall provide a report to the Governor and General Assembly on the effectiveness of sentencing under the new provisions, including recommendations on whether the new sentencing provisions should be adjusted or continued. Amends the Criminal Code of 2012 to make conforming changes and changes the penalties for burglary.
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