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Author Topic: Elderly Bill Legislation  (Read 28021 times)

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Offline Forevermah

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Re: Elderly Bill Legislation
« Reply #20 on: July 13, 2014, 02:00:18 PM »
From the interview, it sounds like Michael Zalewski is a good one to contact with concerns.  He seems pretty open to suggestions.   

He is the CO Chair of this Committee and it sounds like they really want to get something done, LET US HOPE !!!!

Do not forget about our Bill Ryan either for contacting with concerns.  There will be a push for family members of inmates to testify when that meeting comes up.
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Offline Bill

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Re: Elderly Bill Legislation
« Reply #21 on: July 14, 2014, 08:22:42 PM »
From the interview, it sounds like Michael Zalewski is a good one to contact with concerns.  He seems pretty open to suggestions.  

He is the CO Chair of this Committee and it sounds like they really want to get something done, LET US HOPE !!!!

Do not forget about our Bill Ryan either for contacting with concerns.  There will be a push for family members of inmates to testify when that meeting comes up.
i suggest IPTers contact joint committee members whose members are listed on previous pages.

This committee reall needs to hear from family members. telling your story. i think this committee will recommend some changes but how many and what is not known.

Contact members tell them of your and your LO's experiences with IDOC.
if questions please let me know

Offline Forevermah

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Re: Elderly Bill Legislation
« Reply #22 on: July 14, 2014, 08:31:04 PM »

This is the list of Committee members that Bill is suggesting people  contact:

 Committee members:

CO-chairs: Rep Michael Zalewski, (D-23 ) Riverside
                   Sen. Michael Noland   ( D- 22)Elgin

Rep.John Anthony (R-) Morris
Rep.Ken Dunkin (D-5) Chicago
Rep. Dennis Reboletti (R-45) Addison
Rep. Arthur Turner (D-9) Chicago
Sen. Kwame Raoul (D-13) Chicago
Sen. Patricia Van Pelt (D-5) Chicago
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Offline Forevermah

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Re: Elderly Bill Legislation
« Reply #23 on: July 15, 2014, 06:34:10 AM »





State panel to tackle prisoner reduction

Mon, Jul 14, 2014

By Tony Arnold

A small panel of Illinois lawmakers meets this week with a lofty goal.  They want to find a way to reduce the prison population, cut down on recidivism - but still enforce strict laws.  IPR’s Tony Arnold reports.

 Illinois State Representative Mike Zalewski is gathering the committee to look at the big picture on prisons.

 They’ll discuss overcrowding in Illinois’ prisons - and the billion dollars they cost taxpayers each year.

 Zalewski says he’s tired of not doing anything about it.

 ZALEWSKI: I heard statistics somewhere that the average stay sometimes for a first-time marijuana user in the Department of Corrections is like 12 days if they don’t get an I-bond. 12 days. That’s insane.

 But low level drug offenses isn’t all Zalewski is looking at.

 He’ll also be bringing back one proposal that’s been debated for years - but never got enough support.

 It would send people convicted of certain gun crimes to prison for 3 years - end of story.

 No early release.

 But even though it hasn’t gotten enough Yes votes - it hasn’t gone away because Chicago Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy talks about it constantly.

 McCARTHY: Possession of a loaded firearm is not even considered a violent felony in the State of Illinois for sentencing purposes. Which is why you see the revolving door. Which is why you see people getting arrested with guns over and over again. Zalewski has carried bills for Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel before. But with this gun bill - he’s up against some strong opponents.

 The National Rifle Association is one.

 They say lawful gun owners who improperly carry a gun and get caught would have to go away for three years.

 Many black lawmakers are also fighting it - saying just locking people up doesn’t truly address gun violence issues in their communities.

 Zalewski says a negotiated version might send someone to prison for less than 3 years...

 Or punish someone more on their first gun offense.

 ZALEWSKI: I think people are so worn out by my bill and by the budget problems we have. And they’re sick of seeing the Department of Corrections have these budget issues and having guys sleep in gymnasiums, there’s just a real appetite to, ‘Let’s do something.’

 Art Lurigio says it’s good to recognize that Illinois’ criminal justice system need to change...

 It’s just a matter of what that change is.

 He’s a psychology professor and criminologist at Loyola University.

 LURIGIO: Research suggests that it’s not the severity of the punishment that has a deterrent effect, but the certainty of punishment.

 Lurigio’s point is that research shows people with guns don’t necessarily worry about how long they’ll spend behind bars - it’s whether they’ll get caught.

 He says alternatives to prison can actually have more of a positive effect than locking up low-level criminals.

 LURIGIO: We’re keeping a lot of money to keep people locked up in prison. The time that they spend in prison is time away from them ever having an opportunity to change their life trajectory unless they’re fully engaged in services.

 That’s where Father David Kelly comes in.

 Because while Representative Zalewski and lawmakers are dealing with end of the criminal justice process - prisons - Father Kelly deals with the beginning of that process - kids who are getting in trouble.

 Kelly runs Precious Blood Ministries in the Back of the Yards neighborhood in Chicago.

 KELLY: These drums are used in the juvenile detention center. We do drumming circles at juvenile detention center. So I’m the chaplain at Cook County Juvenile, as well…(FADE)

 As he gives me a tour of the center - which is a former school…

 He shows me a clothes rack - with dress clothes for the teenagers who have upcoming court appearances.

 Precious Blood deals mostly with teens who have already been arrested and done time.

 Kelly says whatever the laws are that do pass - he wants to see more neighborhood programs.

 KELLY: Rather than harsher laws, harsher gun penalties, let’s punish our way out of this, I just don’t think there’s an end to that. I don’t think that will get us anywhere but fill our jails and prisons and then take the minimum resources we do have here in the community away.

 Kelly says the young people he interacts with now - are the ones statistics show are going to end up testing out the laws Representative Zalewski is thinking of changing. And the best way to make sure they don’t end up testing those laws and getting arrested - doesn’t come from legislators - but from getting more people in the community involved. 


http://m.peoriapublicradio.org/?utm_referrer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com%2F#mobile/26459
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Offline Forevermah

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Re: Elderly Bill Legislation
« Reply #24 on: July 15, 2014, 08:00:07 PM »



Illinois lawmakers take testimony on prisons

2 hours ago


CHICAGO (AP) — A legislative committee is gathering information on ways to address Illinois' prison population.

The Joint Criminal Justice Reform Committee heard more than three hours of testimony Tuesday in Chicago during its first meeting.

The bipartisan committee will also look at how to reduce racial disparities in sentencing and the number of people released from prison who commit new crimes.

Rep. Mike Zalewski (zuh-LEH'-skee) is a Riverside Democrat who pushed to create the committee. He says he wants efforts to be data driven. The group is expected to release recommendations at year's end. Zalewski says he hopes that also means some legislation.

Those who testified included Illinois Department of Corrections officials who raised concerns about the growing number of geriatric inmates. Lake County authorities also discussed issues for mentally-ill inmates.

http://jg-tc.com/news/state-and-regional/illinois-lawmakers-take-testimony-on-prisons/article_bca2eda5-ff84-59fa-9d10-9bdadacfe560.html
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Offline Forevermah

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Re: Elderly Bill Legislation
« Reply #25 on: July 16, 2014, 06:36:11 AM »



Panel to debate gun laws, how to reduce Illinois prison population

July 15, 2014
By: Tony Arnold


A small panel of Illinois lawmakers meets this week with a lofty goal. It wants to find a way to reduce the prison population, cut down on recidivism, but still enforce strict laws.A small panel of Illinois lawmakers meets this week with a lofty goal. It wants to find a way to reduce the prison population, cut down on recidivism, but still enforce strict laws.

Illinois State Rep. Mike Zalewski is gathering the committee to look at the big picture on prisons. They’ll discuss overcrowding in Illinois’ prisons and the billion dollars they cost taxpayers each year. Zalewski said he’s tired of not doing anything about it.

“I heard statistics somewhere that the average stay sometimes for a first-time marijuana user in the Department of Corrections is like 12 days if they don’t get an I-bond. 12 days. That’s insane,” he said in an interview at his downtown Chicago law office.

But low level drug offenses isn’t all Zalewski is looking at. He’ll also be bringing back one proposal that’s been debated for years, but never got enough support. A previous version of the proposal would’ve send people convicted of certain gun crimes to prison for three years, end of story. No early release.

But even though it hasn’t gotten enough ‘yes’ votes, it hasn’t gone away because Chicago Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy talks about it constantly.

“Possession of a loaded firearm is not even considered a violent felony in the State of Illinois for sentencing purposes,” McCarthy told reporters last week. “Which is why you see the revolving door. Which is why you see people getting arrested with guns over and over again.”

Zalewski has carried bills for Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel before. But with this gun bill, he’s up against some strong opponents.

The National Rifle Association is one. They say lawful gun owners who improperly carry a gun and get caught would have to go away for three years.

Many black lawmakers are also fighting it, saying just locking people up doesn’t truly address gun violence issues in their communities.

Zalewski says a negotiated version might send someone to prison for less than three years, or punish someone more on their first gun offense.

“I think people are so worn out by my bill and by the budget problems we have,” Zalewski said. “And they’re sick of seeing the Department of Corrections have these budget issues and having guys sleep in gymnasiums, there’s just a real appetite to, ‘Let’s do something.’”

Art Lurigio says it’s good to recognize that Illinois’ criminal justice system need to change. It’s just a matter of what that change is.

“Research suggests that it’s not the severity of the punishment that has a deterrent effect, but the certainty of punishment,” said Lurigio, a psychology professor and criminologist at Loyola University.

Lurigio’s point is that research shows people with guns don’t necessarily worry about how long they’ll spend behind bars, it’s whether they’ll get caught. He said alternatives to prison can actually have more of a positive effect than locking up low-level criminals.

“We’re keeping a lot of money to keep people locked up in prison,” he said. “The time that they spend in prison is time away from them ever having an opportunity to change their life trajectory unless they’re fully engaged in services.

That’s where Father David Kelly comes in.

Because while Rep. Zalewski and lawmakers are dealing with end of the criminal justice process - prisons - Father Kelly deals with the beginning of that process: kids who are getting in trouble.

“These drums are used in the juvenile detention center. We do drumming circles at juvenile detention center. So I’m the chaplain at Cook County Juvenile, as well,” said Kelly, who runs Precious Blood Ministries in the Back of the Yards neighborhood in Chicago.

As he gives me a tour of the center, which is a former school, he shows me a clothes rack with dress clothes for the teenagers who have upcoming court appearances. Precious Blood deals mostly with teens who have already been arrested and done time.

Kelly said whatever the laws are that do pass, he wants to see more neighborhood programs.

“Rather than harsher laws, harsher gun penalties, let’s punish our way out of this, I just don’t think there’s an end to that,” Kelly said. “ I don’t think that will get us anywhere but fill our jails and prisons and then take the minimum resources we do have here in the community away.”

Kelly said the young people he interacts with now are the ones statistics show are going to end up testing out the laws Rep. Zalewski is thinking of changing. And the best way to make sure they don’t end up testing those laws and getting arrested doesn’t come from legislators, but from getting more people in the community involved.


http://www.wbez.org/news/panel-debate-gun-laws-how-reduce-illinois-prison-population-110496
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Offline Forevermah

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Re: Elderly Bill Legislation
« Reply #26 on: July 16, 2014, 09:08:20 AM »

The hearing yesterday focused on IDOC testimony from S.A. Godinez, Director IDOC, Kathy Saltmarsh/Illinois Sentencing Policy Advisory Board and John Maki, John Howard Association.  It included lots of data, discussion about non violent low level offenders, use of risk assessments/costs.

The next hearing is August 19th, we will post on topic and times etc.

Rep. Micheal Zawleski and Rep. Michael Nolan need to hear from families of inmates, NOW

Anyone wanting to submit testimony should contact them, now is your chance to get involved, everyone always says, I wish there was something *I* could do, well now there is!!!!

If you have questions, you can contact our member Bill by private message and ask your questions.

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Offline jaf

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Re: Elderly Bill Legislation
« Reply #27 on: July 16, 2014, 09:28:06 AM »

The hearing yesterday focused on IDOC testimony from S.A. Godinez, Director IDOC, Kathy Saltmarsh/Illinois Sentencing Policy Advisory Board and John Maki, John Howard Association.  It included lots of data, discussion about non violent low level offenders, use of risk assessments/costs.

The next hearing is August 19th, we will post on topic and times etc.

Rep. Micheal Zawleski and Rep. Michael Nolan need to hear from families of inmates, NOW

Anyone wanting to submit testimony should contact them, now is your chance to get involved, everyone always says, I wish there was something *I* could do, well now there is!!!!

If you have questions, you can contact our member Bill by private message and ask your questions.



Yesterday morning after I read the info on here, I sent an email to Rep. Reboletti, but I will do more.   

I guess I hadn't been paying attention because I thought yesterday's hearing was to be about sentence reductions for the elderly people in prison.
I really wish I could have listened to it, but had to take my mom to the  Dr. in the morning and then help with a big youth event and concert at church the rest of the day. 

I sure hope someone will give us more info on what was talked about yesterday. 

I also hope the next meeting will be in Springfield!
   

Offline chantygirl

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Re: Elderly Bill Legislation
« Reply #28 on: July 16, 2014, 11:31:30 AM »
I didn't listen to it either, and wish I would have.  But, I also sent emails out.  I even got some additional ideas/feedback from my l/o when he called last night. 

Offline Forevermah

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Re: Elderly Bill Legislation
« Reply #29 on: July 16, 2014, 11:41:32 AM »

The hearing yesterday focused on IDOC testimony from S.A. Godinez, Director IDOC, Kathy Saltmarsh/Illinois Sentencing Policy Advisory Board and John Maki, John Howard Association.  It included lots of data, discussion about non violent low level offenders, use of risk assessments/costs.

The next hearing is August 19th, we will post on topic and times etc.

Rep. Micheal Zawleski and Rep. Michael Nolan need to hear from families of inmates, NOW

Anyone wanting to submit testimony should contact them, now is your chance to get involved, everyone always says, I wish there was something *I* could do, well now there is!!!!

If you have questions, you can contact our member Bill by private message and ask your questions.



Yesterday morning after I read the info on here, I sent an email to Rep. Reboletti, but I will do more.   

I guess I hadn't been paying attention because I thought yesterday's hearing was to be about sentence reductions for the elderly people in prison.
I really wish I could have listened to it, but had to take my mom to the  Dr. in the morning and then help with a big youth event and concert at church the rest of the day. 

I sure hope someone will give us more info on what was talked about yesterday. 

I also hope the next meeting will be in Springfield!
   

The elderly bill is all part of it to reduce the prison population, along with everything else these articles are talking about to reduce those in prison and those that may be going to prison.  We have to stop the overcrowding and possible new legislation on sentencing etc will be brought forward.

Not sure where the next meeting will be, IPT will post as soon as we know, but it may not be that meeting that families will be able to testify, that may not be until later in the year at future hearings.
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Offline Forevermah

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Re: Elderly Bill Legislation
« Reply #30 on: July 16, 2014, 12:54:38 PM »


For those members who want to do talk/write to these Committee Members, reread Bill Ryan's testimony for ideas:


http://www.illinoisprisontalk.org/pdf/jointcomm2014.pdf
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Re: Elderly Bill Legislation
« Reply #31 on: July 22, 2014, 01:06:04 PM »
Free some older, nonviolent, longtime prisoners: activist

Tue, 07/22/2014 - 10:07am
Thomas Frisbie

Should prisoners over age 50 who have served at least 25 years have a chance to get parole?

The Illinois Joint Criminal Justice Reform Committee is holding hearings on prison crowding and sentencing, and here is part of what prison-reform activist Bill Ryan plans to tell the committee on Aug. 19, the second of the committee's hearings (the first was July 15). Ryan belongs to several groups, including the Illinois Institute for Community Law, the National Alliance Against Racist and Political Repression-Chicago and Project 1-11, and he  is a co-founder of Stateville Speaks, an Illinois prison newspaper now in its 10th year.

Quotes from his planned testimony. :

-- "During the past 20 years I have come to know many elderly men and women in prison. I consider many of them good friends. Many have reformed themselves and present no threat to anybody. There are others who should not be released. I am convinced that a human being is more than the worst thing he or she has done."

-- "In Illinois, there are about 49,000 people in prison and another 25,000 on parole. About 60 percent of people released come back within three years. This is a failing system."

-- "Currently there are about 800 men and women who meet these criteria. (Twenty years ago there were 32.) If 100 of the 800 eligible people were to earn parole, the state would reduce expenditures by $7.5 million."

-- "Some victims’ families, supported by prosecutors, are opposed to any kind of sentence review. There are other victims’ families who support the Elderly Bill. Please remember in your deliberations that there is no one voice for crime victims’ family members."

-- "With savings from a reduced prison population, money could be directed toward crime victims’ needs—toward helping to restore broken families and communities, toward good rather than harm."

 Ryan previously testified on March 4 about HB 3668, a bill that would have given older prisoners a chance to get parole. He hopes that idea will be part of any new legislation. The committee hopes to have legislation to deal with prison crowding and disparate racial sentencing drawn up by December so it can be voted on in the Legislature's veto session, he said.

Earlier this month, Gov. Pat Quinn outlined his hopes for the legislation, saying, "As I've made clear, it is necessary to take a comprehensive approach to public safety that includes stronger gun laws such as those included in the Public Safety Act, smarter sentencing reforms and greater investments in proven re-entry and diversion programs as I proposed in this year's budget."

Co-chair state Rep. Michael Zalewski pushed to form the committee during the spring legislative session.

Read a Feb. 13 Chicago Sun-Times editorial headlined "Take a new look at cost of keeping old prisoners" here.


http://politics.suntimes.com/article/springfield/free-some-older-nonviolent-longtime-prisoners-activist/tue-07222014-307pm

Offline Forevermah

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Re: Elderly Bill Legislation
« Reply #32 on: August 09, 2014, 08:43:33 AM »
The next meeting for the Joint Criminal Justice Reform Committee on Sentencing Reform will be on:


8/19/2014  -  10:00 AM 
C600 Michael A. Bilandic Building
Chicago, IL
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Offline Forevermah

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Re: Elderly Bill Legislation
« Reply #33 on: August 12, 2014, 07:24:38 AM »



Notes provided by Project I-11 for the meeting on July 15th

Legislative Activity

Adopted on May 30, 2014, the newly formed Criminal Justice Reform Committee held its first meeting to a packed house in Chicago on July 15.

Co-chairs Rep. Michael Zalewski (D-Riverside) and Sen. Michael Noland (D-Elgin) chaired the meeting. The speakers were Salvador Godinez, director of IDOC; Kathy Saltmarsh, executive director of the Illinois Sentencing Policy Advisory Council; John Maki, executive director of John Howard Association; Cara Smith, executive director of Cook County Jail; and Raymond Rose, undersheriff of Lake County.

This three-hour hearing was devoted to numbers, data, research – how many prisoners we have, who they are, how much they cost; and what programs should be established to reduce the prison population and lower costs. Most suggestions were aimed at assisting short-termers and the overlapping group of nonviolent prisoners. Nevertheless, Rep. Turner asked important questions about the rising and increasingly expensive group of elderly prisoners, who are largely long-termers convicted of violent crimes.

Kathy Saltmarsh provided the analytical basis for arguing that parole for long-termers is necessary, by informing the committee that the State must move out some long-termers now serving sentences if it wishes to reduce the prison population; decreasing sentences for those convicted down the road or shortening sentences for short-termers or is not enough.

All speakers, and even the Committee members, seemed united in the belief that something must be done to bring down the prison population, and that right-minded remedies such as reentry programs and community-based diversion programs are necessary. Yet Committee members also spoke of the fear of voter backlash when someone released early commits a high-profile crime, and they noted, not always with sureness, that tremendous courage was necessary to withstand the negative criticism. The Committee expects to hold further meetings, and will ask for testimony from the public at some point. Currently, their report is due by December 1.







August 19 Joint Criminal Justice Reform Committee meeting

The next hearing of Joint Criminal Justice Reform Committee is on August 19, at 10 am, on the 6th floor (C-600) of the Bilandic Building. The address is 160 North LaSalle Street, Chicago.

Committee members are interested in sentencing reform in order to reduce violence, decrease prison population, and make sentencing more just and effective. The Committee needs to hear your concerns and suggestions. Please attend this hearing as well as contact the committee members. Members and contact info can be found on General Assembly website.
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Offline Forevermah

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Re: Elderly Bill Legislation
« Reply #34 on: August 24, 2014, 03:22:02 PM »


The Joint Criminal Justice Reform Committee was established to “examine the impact of current sentencing structure, ensure the enforcement and punishment of crime does not disproportionally or unfairly affect certain racial, ethnic, or other groups, and develop solutions to address the issues that exist within the system.”

Given racial disparities in criminal sentencing and dire conditions inside Illinois prisons, the
formation of this committee seemed promising. But if the first public hearings are any indication, neither serious discussion nor broad public input will occur. The committee will hold more hearings before the final report is submitted in December, and I hope that the process improves dramatically.

At the two hearings I attended, suggested time frames were ignored, so most of the speakers had very little time. The disregard for time and structure was at odds with the purpose of public hearings: to provide a forum for many voices to be heard. I wanted to represent the voices and experiences of elderly people in prison, but my already meager amount of time (3-5 minutes) was cut in half.

Mass incarceration is a moral crisis. This committee needs to think expansively about how to
address a range of critical matters. How can we lower the recidivism rate? How can we
eliminate overcrowding? How can we prevent wrongful deaths and medical malfeasance inside
prisons? How can we eradicate the racial bias that occurs at every juncture of the system, from
surveillance to arrest to prosecution to sentencing? How can we align sentencing practices with
human rights standards?

I hope that we are at the beginning of an effort to fashion a criminal justice system driven by
fairness and democratic principles rather than fear and cynicism. Illinois can build on its
courageous decision to confront, rather than deny, the failures of the death penalty. We need
an honest assessment of what is happening to men, women, and teenagers in prison. The time
is now to redirect our resources and policies. I look forward to a more deliberative and fair
process at subsequent hearings.

Bill Ryan



Please Contact Committee Members and let them know your concerns, now is the time for comprehensive reform!!
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Offline chantygirl

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Re: Elderly Bill Legislation
« Reply #35 on: August 24, 2014, 07:37:48 PM »
I've never been to any of these types of things, so, I feel I need to ask.  Is it better to contact them through email beforehand, or just show up?  What's the best course of action here?  While visiting, I told my l/o about the next meeting (he gave me a few suggestions before the most recent meeting, which I already passed along to committee members), and he told me that he's got more ideas to pass along (and so do a couple of his friends).  I told him to get me the ideas and I would make sure to pass them along.  I plan to go to the next meeting, but, would there be reason to email?  Is everything scheduled?  Do I need to reserve a seat or anything like that?  And what's the dresscode?  I'd imagine the nicer you look the more they pay attention, but, I'm just wondering how formal these things really are.

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Re: Elderly Bill Legislation
« Reply #36 on: August 24, 2014, 07:48:20 PM »
Email them beforehand, then make up a packet with all your ideas and have copies to give them at the meeting you want to testify at.  If you want all the members to have a copy have enough and a few extra, you never know who might want one.

This past meeting, everyone was to have 10 minutes to speak, most ofthe States Attorneys of course got to all go first and went over their time limits, because they all had to leave and get back to their offices.  This meeting went over an hour + longer than it was suppose to and Bill and others had to cut their testimony short because of that.

You don't have to reserve a seat, just get there by on time and there should be seats, or will be as people leave.

The men are usually all in suits and the women are in business attire, I would say no jeans/sweats orreal casual wear and you are right, the more professional one comes across the better it always is.

Don't forget this is the State of Illinois Building, so you will be checked going in through metals detectors and then allowed to go up to where the meeting is.
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Offline momm316

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Re: Elderly Bill Legislation
« Reply #37 on: September 07, 2014, 09:38:34 PM »
The only bill that was getting any thought last session was House Bill 3668 - I am pasting it below.  I did notice that a  new individual (Rep. Linda Chapa LaVia) signed on to co-sponsor in August.  But it is stuck in Rules Committee now, where they usually send things to die....  The General Assembly does not resume until after the election in November...  It would have to be re-introduced with a new number for the next General Assembly Session.

HB 3668
Short Description:  CD CORR-SENTENCE ELDERLY

House Sponsors
Rep. Arthur Turner - William Davis - Emanuel Chris Welch - Derrick Smith - Barbara Flynn Currie, Mary E. Flowers, Naomi D. Jakobsson, Esther Golar, Elaine Nekritz, Monique D. Davis, Camille Y. Lilly and Linda Chapa LaVia

Last Action
Date   Chamber    Action
  4/11/2014   House   Rule 19(a) / Re-referred to Rules Committee

Statutes Amended In Order of Appearance
730 ILCS 5/3-3-2   from Ch. 38, par. 1003-3-2
730 ILCS 5/5-8-1   from Ch. 38, par. 1005-8-1
730 ILCS 5/5-8-1.4 new   


Synopsis As Introduced
Amends the Unified Code of Corrections. Provides that a committed person who is at least 50 years of age and who has served at least 25 consecutive years of imprisonment in a Department of Corrections institution or facility may petition the Prisoner Review Board for participation in the Elderly Rehabilitated Prisoner Sentence Modification Program. Provides that if the committed person files the petition, the victims and the families of the victims of the committed person's offenses shall be notified in a timely manner after the filing of the petition. Provides that the Board shall consider the petition in its entirety and shall not order the release of the committed person if it finds that the committed person poses a threat to public safety. Provides that if the Board determines that a committed person is eligible for participation in the Program and that the committed person should participate in the Program, the Board shall set the conditions for the committed person's release from prison before the expiration of his or her sentence. Provides that when granting participation in the Program, the Board may require the committed person, for a period of time upon release, to participate in community service or to wear an electronic monitoring device, or both.

House Committee Amendment No. 1
Adds reference to:
730 ILCS 5/3-3-3   from Ch. 38, par. 1003-3-3
730 ILCS 5/5-8-1.5 new   

Replaces everything after the enacting clause. Reinserts the provisions of the bill, except: (1) refers to the Program as the Sentence Modification Program; (2) provides that the petition shall contain reasons why the committed person should be granted participation in the Program and, where possible, should provide relevant documentation and statements of support; (3) provides that the petition shall, in the first instance, be screened by the Department of Corrections, which shall determine whether the petitioner should be considered for participation in the Program; (4) provides that the victim or the victim's family shall be notified of any public meeting at which the Prisoner Review Board intends to deliberate on the committed person's participation in the Program; (5) provides that beginning on the effective date of the amendatory Act, notwithstanding any other law to the contrary, all persons serving sentences in the Department of Corrections are eligible to participate in the Sentence Modification Program; (6) provides that notwithstanding any other provision of law to the contrary, any committed person who is serving a sentence, including one who has not yet served the minimum term of the sentence, who is diagnosed as suffering from a terminal or debilitating condition so as to render the committed person unlikely to be physically capable of presenting a danger to society, may be released on medical parole to a hospital, hospice, other licensed inpatient facility, or suitable housing accommodation as specified by the Board; (7) provides that the Department shall promptly notify the Board upon receipt of medical information that a committed person has a diagnosis of a terminal or debilitating condition which prevents him or her from filing a petition on his or her own; (8) provides that the Prisoner Review Board shall consider an appropriate plan for living arrangements, which indicates if the person intends to seek admission to a nursing facility and the name of the facility if known; (9) provides that if the committed person's plan for living arrangements includes relocation to a nursing facility, the Board shall notify the facility of the committed person's intent at least 30 days prior to the committed person's release; and (10) provides that the Board shall, prior to committed person's release, arrange for the committed person to be prescreened and to make application for Medicaid Long Term Care services and the Board shall transmit to the facility prior to the committed person's admission documentation of the prescreening and the committed person's eligibility for Medicaid Long Term Care services, and the committed person's prison and criminal history; the later shall serve to meet the nursing facilities obligation to perform a background check.

Actions
Date   Chamber    Action
  9/4/2013           House   Filed with the Clerk by Rep. Arthur Turner
  10/22/2013   House   First Reading
  10/22/2013   House   Referred to Rules Committee
  12/12/2013   House   Added Chief Co-Sponsor Rep. William Davis
  1/13/2014   House   Added Chief Co-Sponsor Rep. Emanuel Chris Welch
  1/14/2014   House   Added Co-Sponsor Rep. Mary E. Flowers
  1/15/2014   House   Added Co-Sponsor Rep. Naomi D. Jakobsson
  2/3/2014           House   Added Chief Co-Sponsor Rep. Derrick Smith
  2/4/2014           House   Added Co-Sponsor Rep. Barbara Flynn Currie
  2/10/2014   House   Added Co-Sponsor Rep. Esther Golar
  2/10/2014   House   Added Chief Co-Sponsor Rep. Barbara Flynn Currie
  2/10/2014   House   Removed Co-Sponsor Rep. Barbara Flynn Currie
  2/10/2014   House   Added Co-Sponsor Rep. Elaine Nekritz
  2/18/2014   House   Assigned to Restorative Justice Committee
  2/20/2014   House   Added Co-Sponsor Rep. Monique D. Davis
  3/18/2014   House   House Committee Amendment No. 1 Filed with Clerk by Rep. Arthur Turner
  3/18/2014   House   House Committee Amendment No. 1 Referred to Rules Committee
  3/19/2014   House   House Committee Amendment No. 1 Rules Refers to Restorative Justice Committee
  3/25/2014   House   House Committee Amendment No. 1 Adopted in Restorative Justice Committee; by Voice Vote
  3/25/2014   House   Do Pass as Amended / Standard Debate Restorative Justice Committee; 004-003-000
  3/25/2014   House   Placed on Calendar 2nd Reading - Standard Debate
  4/3/2014           House   Added Co-Sponsor Rep. Camille Y. Lilly
  4/9/2014           House   Second Reading - Standard Debate
  4/9/2014           House   Placed on Calendar Order of 3rd Reading - Standard Debate
  4/11/2014   House   Rule 19(a) / Re-referred to Rules Committee
  8/5/2014           House   Added Co-Sponsor Rep. Linda Chapa LaVia

My son heard the same rumors that were talked about above and I had to tell him that no, there was no legislation passed and there is nothing the governor is waiting to sign.  The fact is... if any legislation was being considered, the media would be all over it.... and if any legislation passes, the governor has 60 days to sign or veto it.  Otherwise, it becomes law in 60 days if it has passed both the Senate and House.
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Offline Forevermah

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Re: Elderly Bill Legislation
« Reply #38 on: September 08, 2014, 07:14:19 AM »
Momm316, the particular bill you posted above is dead, but there is a committee holding hearings now that wants to draft new legislation and that is why this topic has been posted for information on the new legislation, the hearings and all that is going on in regards to that, but nothing is final and when it is and if the NEW bill does get drafted we will have the information here on IPT.
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Offline Forevermah

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Re: Elderly Bill Legislation
« Reply #39 on: September 15, 2014, 10:04:49 AM »



The next TWO meetings of this committee will also be held in Chicago

Sept 23rd at 10 am - - and Oct 14th at 1:30 pm   

they will be in room C600 at the  Bilandic Building
 
Do not value the "things" you have in your life - value "who" you have in your life....



“Instead of thinking about what you're missing, try thinking about what you have that everyone else is missing.”


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