Illinois Prison Talk
News: wc75-1  ILLINOIS PRISON LOCKDOWN STATUS:

MENARD ON  LOCKDOWN. CALL BEFORE VISITING. 
 

 
*
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register. July 29, 2014, 01:52:34 PM


Login with username, password and session length


Pages: 1   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Most Frequently Asked IDOC Questions and Answers  (Read 2956 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Forevermah
Administrator
Hero Member
******

Karma: 467
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Location: Illinois
Posts: 16659



WWW
« on: March 02, 2013, 02:48:24 PM »



From the IDOC website:   MOST FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS



    What is Sentence Credit?
    Does Corrections have a program of incarceration payments?
    What are "C-Number" inmates?
    How do sentencing laws work?
    Can I communicate with an inmate over the Internet?
    What is the situation with older inmates?
    I am a former inmate of IDOC and would like to have my name removed from the Internet Inmate Search Database. How can I do that?
    How do I write/correspond with an inmate?
    What items can I mail to an inmate?
    How can I send money to an inmate?
    What is the situation with boot camps in Illinois?
    What is the procedure for assigning inmates to facilities when they begin to serve their sentence?
    How long must an inmate be in prison before they can go to a work release center?
    How can I obtain public archived information about past IDOC inmates?
    What is the role of Prisoner Review Board?
    My family member is incarcerated. What services are available for me and my family?
    What are the procedures for receiving collect telephone calls from an inmate?
    What are the procedures for visiting an inmate?
    What is IDOC's visitation policy for a proposed visitor who has been convicted of a criminal offense or who has criminal charges pending?
    Who sets the conditions for parole?
    How can I obtain public information about a current inmate or parolee?
    What is reception and classification?
    What medicines can an offender bring once sentenced to the Illinois Department of Corrections?
    How does an inmate get transferred to another facility?
    What is the situation with work release programs in Illinois?
    As a victim of a crime, is there any information available from the department?
    How can I be notified of the release, transfer, escape, death, or out-to-court appearance of an inmate who is incarcerated in the Illinois Department of Corrections?
    How do I obtain medical information about an inmate currently incarcerated?
    Where can I get information regarding sex offenders?
    How can an inmate being released to parole be approved to reside at my residence?
    How can a parolee be transferred to another state?
    How do I report possible criminal behavior of a parolee or a parole absconder?
    I am interested in a career with the Illinois Department of Corrections. How can I obtain more information?
    How can I serve as a volunteer with the Illinois Department of Corrections?
    What's the difference between a jail and a prison?


What is Sentence Credit?

General Overview

There are various forms of sentence credits available to offenders, however not all offenders are eligible for each type of credit. The three most common types of credit are Statutory Sentence Credit, Program Sentence Credit, and Supplemental Sentence Credit.

Statutory Sentence Credit refers to the percentage of time a determinate-sentenced offender must spend incarcerated. Offenders serve 50%, 75%, 85%, or 100% of their sentence, determined by statute, and based on the offense that was committed. For example, an offender who received a 4 year sentence for burglary would serve 50% of his sentence by statute, or 2 years. Offenders may lose statutory sentence credit based on negative behavior while in custody.

Program Sentence Credit refers to time earned by an offender for participation in education, life skills courses, behavioral modification, drug treatment, re-entry planning, or Illinois Correctional Industries programs. Not all offenders are eligible for programming credit; for instance, offenders convicted of violent and Class X crimes are not eligible but may still be able to participate in such programming. Offenders earn one-half day off their sentence for each day of participation in such programs if they successfully complete the programs (Example: if an eligible offender completes a drug treatment program that is 30-days in duration, he may be awarded 15-days off his sentence). Offenders may lose program sentence credit based on bad behavior while in custody.

Supplemental Sentence Credit (“SSC”) refers to credit of up to 180 days on an offender’s incarceration that can be issued as a result of an offender’s good conduct. This credit is at the sole discretion of the Director of the Department of Corrections or his designee. Similar to Statutory Sentence Credit and Program Sentence Credit, offenders may lose SSC based on their behavior while in custody.

In response to changes in the law regarding awards of sentence credit, revised administrative rules have been finalized and appear in the Illinois Register. Under the revised rules, review of offenders for an award of SSC is pursuant to 20 Ill. Adm. Code 107.210, “Awarding of Supplemental Sentence Credit.”

For an offender to be eligible for an award of SSC, first and foremost, he or she must have served more than 60 days in IDOC custody and be serving a sentence for offenses that are not excluded from an award pursuant to Section 3-6-3(a)(3) of the Code of Corrections (730 ILCS 5/3-6-3(a)(3)). Additionally, some offenders, by the nature of their current commitment offenses, will only be eligible for up to 90 days of SSC pursuant to Section 3-6-3(a)(3) of the Code of Corrections.

There are additional administrative rule requirements that must be met in order for an offender to be eligible for an award of SSC. The offender:

    must not be subject to review under the Sexually Violent Person’s Act,
    must not have been found guilty of a 100 level disciplinary offense (violated while in custody) under 20 Ill. Adm. Code 504,
    must not have any pending criminal charges committed during the current incarceration,
    must not have been returned to the Department for a violation of his or her parole or mandatory supervised release during their current incarceration,
    must not have voluntarily quit or have been terminated for disciplinary reasons from a boot camp program,
    if recommended by a court, must have completed substance abuse treatment or been waived from the requirement by the Department, and
    must have completed mandatory sex offender treatment (if necessary) or been waived of the requirement by the Department (if applicable).

It is important to note that even if an offender is potentially eligible for an award of SSC, the offender should not and does not have an outright expectation to receive an award.

Potentially eligible offenders should have no expectation of receiving an SSC award because, beyond the eligibility requirements noted above, the Department has the discretion to consider numerous other factors before finding an offender suitable for an award of SSC. As such, the Department may examine and consider numerous things including, but not limited to:

    The offender’s complete master record file, including, but not limited to, sentencing material such as facts and circumstances of the holding offense, disciplinary records, and reports or recommendations made concerning the offender.
    The offender’s risk assessment analysis (if available).
    The offender’s history of conviction for violent crimes, as defined by the Rights of Crime Victims and Witnesses Act [725 ILCS 120].
    The offender’s assignment performance while in the custody of the Department.
    The offender’s educational or program performance and achievements while in the custody of the Department.
    The offender’s service to the Department, community, or State.
    The heroic action of the offender, such as saving the life of an employee or other offender.
    The offender's potential for rehabilitation.

The Department is working both carefully and diligently to review offenders for SSC pursuant to the above statutory eligibility requirements and comprehensive discretionary analysis.

For those with family or friends within IDOC we appreciate your patience as the Department works to safely and responsibly implement the SSC credit program. Because of the many factors the Department intends to consider for each potentially eligible offender, it is impossible for the Department to project whether or when any specific offender will receive an award of SSC credit. It is also not possible for the Department to respond to inquiries concerning an offender’s likelihood of receiving an award of SSC due to the Department’s policy that prevents the disclosure of confidential master record file information and criminal history. If an offender is projected to have a revised parole date as a result of an award of SSC, the inmate will be notified, and his or her time adjustment will be reflected on the IDOC website under the offender’s profile in the Offender Search link.



Does Corrections have a program of incarceration payments?


Mothers of children whose father is incarcerated sometimes find it difficult to make ends meet. They seek "incarceration pay" from the Department of Corrections to help them support the children while the father is incarcerated. There is no Illinois Corrections program that allows the agency to financially support children of incarcerated fathers or mothers.



What are "C-Number" inmates?

"C-Numbers" refers to those inmates who were convicted to indeterminate sentences prior to implementation of determinate sentencing in 1978. C-numbered inmates periodically appear before members of the Illinois Prisoner Review Board to plead their case for parole. Other inmates serve a specific amount of time and are released after serving a percentage of their sentence.



How do sentencing laws work?

The Illinois General Assembly passed legislation in 1977 that changed the state's sentencing laws. It also established a new category of crime (Class X for the most violent crimes) as well as creating the death sentence and natural life sentence. Legislators also displaced the Illinois Parole and Pardon Board with the Illinois Prisoner Review Board. This eliminated a subjective determination by members of the Parole and Pardon Board as to when or why an inmate could be released from prison.

Determinate sentencing became effective in February 1978. Inmates convicted of crimes committed in 1978 or later were given determinate sentences -- specific amounts of time based on the seriousness of the crime.  Previously, an inmate received an indeterminate sentence -- or range of time -- and appeared before the Parole and Pardon Board which determined suitability for release to parole.

Until passage of "Truth in Sentencing" laws in the 1990s (730 ILCS 5/3-6-3), all inmates were to spend half their sentences incarcerated in jail or prison (less awards of good time).  Under “Truth in Sentencing” laws, those convicted of first degree murder will serve 100 percent of the sentence.  Those committing other violent offenses under Truth in Sentencing laws will serve 85 percent of their sentence.

The Illinois Department of Corrections is not a lawmaking entity and does not hand down sentences to those who come into the state’s prison system. IDOC incarcerates individuals committed to it by the courts of this state.



Can I communicate with an inmate over the Internet?

No. Inmates are not permitted access to the Internet, nor can they have personal computers in their cells. Inmates may use computers if their educational program merits it.



What is the situation with older inmates?

Traditionally, inmates 50 year of age or older make up five to six percent of the inmate population. While the percentage of older inmates has not increased dramatically, the number of older inmates has increased as the population has quadrupled during the last three decades. And, as younger and middle aged inmates continue to serve longer sentences, the number and percentage of older inmates will increase accordingly. In addition, older inmates will likely have increased health issues as they age. Illinois Corrections is carefully monitoring the situation. The agency is exploring ways to care for its elderly and sick population through designated centers of specialized care.  The agency currently has a limited geriatric unit at the Dixon Correctional Center. It houses approximately 80 offenders who are over the age of 50, have multiple medical problems, but function independently. Other older inmates with physical infirmities are housed in prison infirmaries as determined by their clinical and security status.



I am a former inmate of IDOC and would like to have my name removed from the Internet Inmate Search Database. How can I do that?

Inmate conviction information can only be removed with proper paperwork from the committing court. Certified copies of not guilty verdicts on cases reversed and remanded to the circuit court are sufficient. Other court documents may be considered in cases where mistrials are ruled in remanded cases. Former inmates who have received pardons and commutations will have cases reviewed on an individual basis after Prisoner Review Board documents are submitted to the agency by the board at the request of the former inmate. Paperwork and a cover letter should be submitted to the IDOC Public Information Office.



How do I write/correspond with an inmate?

Inmates may receive mail at any time during their incarceration. Write an inmate as you would anyone else, but remember to put the inmate IDOC number in the proximity of his name on the envelope. Your letter to the inmate will be opened and searched for contraband. If contraband is found, we will ask the state’s attorney of your county to prosecute you to the fullest extent of the law. We are not interested in what you write the inmate, unless it contains plans for his escape or other illegal activity. Please do not decorate the envelope with stickers. We strictly enforce the prohibition of stickers since they may be used to introduce contraband materials. Any document received at a prison that has stickers attached will be returned.  You can locate the inmate IDOC number on the Inmate Search link. The information will feature the facility in which the inmate is housed.  Facility addresses are under the Facilities & Visitation.



What items can I mail to an inmate?

Inmates are provided food, clothing and healthcare. To ensure safety and security in the prison system, inmates are able to purchase approved items in the commissary.

Inmates can receive correspondence, legal mail and publications, which are reviewed to determine whether they are obscene or constitute a danger to safety and security. The institutional Publication Review Committee reviews all publications that are not on the approved list, and will disapprove materials that do not meet criteria. Inmates can receive publications, including books, periodicals, magazines, newspapers and catalogs in accordance with department regulations. Inmates can receive publications from a vendor, friend or family. There is no limit through the mail. Publications brought to the facility shall be limited to 5 per visit.

Guidelines need to be followed for envelopes and packages.

    Envelopes that are padded with clear bubble wrap will be accepted.  Envelopes that have this type of padding can be easily scanned.
    Envelopes padded with gray diamond dust and corrugated cardboard boxes mailed from family and friends will not be accepted and will be returned to the sender without being opened. 



How can I send money to an inmate?

Inmates may receive money via JPAY, Western Union or money order.

Electronic Payments: Funds up to $5,000 may be sent to inmates via the following methods.

    JPAY at www.jpay.com
    Money Gram locations using the Blue Money Gram Express Payment Form -  receiving code is 7364
    Western Union at www.westernunion.com or at locations using the Quick Collect Form – code city and state are ILDOC  IL 

For all electronic transfer of funds, the inmate IDOC number and incarcerated last name must be used. Funds sent via JPAY and Western Union are anticipated to be applied to the inmate's account within 24-48 business hours.  Funds sent via Money Gram are anticipated to be applied to the inmate's account within 72 to 96 business hours.  Funds sent during an inmate transfer between facilities may take longer than 24 – 96 business hours.

Money Orders: Inmates may receive money orders not to exceed $200. The money orders must be completed with the inmate name, IDOC inmate number, sender’s name and address. The department reserves the right to withhold the money from the inmate until the money order clears the bank. The money orders should be mailed to the inmate’s current correctional facility.



What is the situation with boot camps in Illinois?

IDOC operates two adult boot camps. The adult camps are located at the DuQuoin State Fairground in Perry County, and Dixon Springs, at the edge of the Shawnee National Forest in southern Illinois. Adult inmates must volunteer before the judge and the placement recommendation by the judge is reviewed when the inmate is received at IDOC. Adults may not have been convicted of a serious crime, must be between the ages of 18-35 and not have been sentenced to IDOC more than twice. They cannot have a sentence of more than 8 years. IDOC retains the right to determine who goes to boot camp based on the nature of the crime and whether the inmate can take the regimentation both physically and mentally. The camp is 120-days in length. Inmates may not have visitors for 30 days, and then only immediate family. They are also restricted from phone calls for a period of time. Inmates may possess only what IDOC gives them.



What is the procedure for assigning inmates to facilities when they begin to serve their sentence?


Inmates will be located at an IDOC reception and classification unit until they are processed for appropriate placement. Inmates are assigned to maximum security prisons if they have a sentence of 20 or more years. Inmates with a 19 to 8 year sentence are eligible for assignment within a medium security facility, while inmates with a sentence of 7 years or less may be assigned to minimum security facilities. Inmates who do not abide by the rules at minimum or medium security prisons may be assigned to maximum security prisons regardless as to the length of time to serve. They may not have visits for a month, then two one-hour visits for the next 30-days, then three one-hour visits for the next 30 days. They are not allowed to make collect phone calls for the first 30-days, may make one 15-minute phone call during the next 30-days, and then three 15-minute phone calls the next 30-days. They cannot have commissary during the first 30-days, and then $15 a month for personal hygiene items for the next 60-days. This is all dependent on maintaining proper discipline.


How long must an inmate be in prison before they can go to a work release center?

The Illinois Department of Corrections (IDOC) operates 4 Adult Transition Centers (ATCs), also referred to as work release centers. One of the centers, Fox Valley ATC in Aurora, houses female inmates. The other 3 facilities house male inmates. The male ATC facilities are Crossroads ATC and North Lawndale ATC in Chicago; and Peoria ATC in Peoria.

Inmates must work or go to school, or both, and return to the center when not occupied in an approved activity in the community. Inmates who are within 2 years of release and classified as minimum security may apply for placement at an ATC through their assigned correctional counselor. Approximately 49,000 adults are incarcerated in IDOC; therefore the agency is selective about who is transferred to ATCs.



How can I obtain public archived information about past IDOC inmates?


Currently, an inmate search on our website will only return information the Department may disclose to the public on IDOC inmates who are currently incarcerated or on parole. If an inmate has completed his or her sentence, the individual's information will not be displayed. Their information is still available; however, you must request it through our archived records search.

The ability to conduct a thorough search of archived records depends on the information received from a requester. Including the following information is helpful: the full name of the person, the date of birth, and the year the inmate was received at the Illinois Department of Corrections.

Additional information about where the inmate served their time, the county where the conviction was handed down and other dates relevant to their incarceration will enhance search efforts. Please be as thorough as possible and check for correct spelling of first and last names.

Requestors must complete the form on the Contact Us page, and should select Record Search under the General Subject section of the form.



What is the role of the Prisoner Review Board?

The Illinois Prisoner Review Board (PRB) is a separate entity from the Illinois Department of Corrections.  The PRB is an independent body whose members are appointed by the Governor of Illinois.  The PRB imposes release conditions for offenders exiting penal facilities, revokes and restores good conduct credits from inmates, conducts hearings to determine whether parolees have violated conditions of parole, and awards certificates of Relief from Disabilities and Certificates of Good Conduct. The PRB notifies victims and their families when an inmate is about to be released from custody. The Board also makes confidential recommendations to the Governor relative to executive clemency petitions.

More information can be found on the Prisoner Review Board website.



My family member is incarcerated. What services are available for me and my family?

This information can be found on the Department of Human Services website.



What are the procedures for receiving collect telephone calls from an inmate?

Inmates cannot receive telephone calls, but can make collect calls to those on their approved calling list. If you want to receive collect calls from an inmate, you will need to write the inmate and ask to be placed on the inmate’s approved calling list. All inmate telephone calls are subject to monitoring and recording at any time by IDOC staff, unless prior special arrangements have been made to make or receive an unmonitored attorney call.

Consolidated Public Services is the service provider for inmate telephone services. If you have questions regarding receiving calls from inmates, you can call 1-800-235-4416 for information. If you wish to receive calls from offenders on your cell phone, you will need to call 1-800-235-4416 to setup a prepaid account prior to accepting calls. If you have a land line phone and your local service provider does not allow billing from outsider parties, you may also be required to setup a prepaid account.

Beginning January 3, 2013, IDOC will begin transferring inmate phone service from Consolidated Public Services to Securus Technologies.  This conversion will begin with Big Muddy Correctional Center.  For a full implementation schedule, please see Inmate Phone Services.

On the new system, the following number will display for Caller ID: 1-866-718-4777

Securus Customer Services at: 1-800-844-6591

For more information visit www.securustech.net

 



What are the procedures for visiting an inmate?

Visit the department’s Visitation Rules & Information webpage for more information.



What is IDOC’s visitation policy for a proposed visitor who has been convicted of a criminal offense or who has criminal charges pending?

You must write the warden to request a visit with a particular offender. A proposed visitor, who has been convicted of a criminal offense or who has criminal charges pending, is on parole, mandatory supervised release, or probation or is an ex-offender, can visit an offender only with the written approval of the warden. Those on parole or mandatory supervised release also need parole agent approval.



Who sets the conditions for parole?


The Illinois Prisoner Review Board (PRB), which is a separate entity of the Illinois Department of Corrections, sets the conditions of parole for a parolee.

Below is the contact information for the PRB:

Illinois Prisoner Review Board
319 East Madison Street, Suite A
Springfield, IL 62701

Telephone: (217) 782-7273
Fax: (217) 524-0012


How can I obtain public information about a current inmate or parolee?


Access the Inmate Search link.

The information which the Department may disclose to the public on any current or former IDOC inmate, includes his or her name, IDOC number, parent institution, current location or status, vital statistics, admission and release dates, and sentencing information. All other information is confidential and may be released only pursuant to a valid subpoena or court order.



What is reception and classification?

It is the policy of IDOC to classify each inmate on an individual basis; to establish the level of security necessary for control; to identify program needs, and to assign inmates to an appropriate institution, facility or program. Inmates will be located at an IDOC reception and classification unit until they are processed for appropriate placement.

Generally, inmates are assigned to maximum-security prisons if they have a sentence of 20 or more years. Inmates with a 19 to 8 year sentence are eligible for assignment within a medium-security facility, while inmates with a sentence of 7 years or less can be assigned to minimum-security facilities. Inmates who do not abide by the rules at minimum- or medium-security prisons can be assigned to maximum-security prisons regardless as to the length of time to serve.

During reception and classification, the inmate is screened by the Health Care Unit staff to address any immediate medical needs. While in reception and classification, inmates cannot make telephone calls; however, they can receive letters via U.S. mail.

Offenders admitted a reception and classification center are in reception status. They remain in reception status until they are transferred to a permanent institution. Privileges and movement are limited at the reception center. There is no set time frame for processing an inmate; the processing varies per inmate.



What medicines can an offender bring once sentenced to the Illinois Department of Corrections?

An offender can bring private medications when arriving at the Reception and Classification Center. However, once at IDOC, the physician will have to determine if they will be continued or if formulary substitutions will be used.



How does an inmate get transferred to another facility?

Offenders can request a transfer to another adult facility through their assigned correctional counselors after they have remained in general population for 6 months at their current facility. Offenders will discuss with their counselors the rationale and eligibility for transfer. Offender transfer requests are then initiated by the assigned correctional counselor and subsequently reviewed by the facility administration with a final recommendation by the warden of the facility. If recommended for approval, the transfer request is forwarded to the Transfer Coordinator’s Office (TCO). The TCO will make a final determination on the request for transfer upon review of all information, including the eligibility and needs of the offender, facility adjustment and the bed space needs of the IDOC.



What is the situation with work release programs in Illinois?

IDOC operates 4 Adult Transition Centers (ATCs), also referred to as work release centers. One of the centers, Fox Valley ATC in Aurora, houses female inmates. The other 3 facilities house male inmates. The male ATC facilities are Crossroads ATC and North Lawndale ATC in Chicago and Peoria ATC in Peoria.

IDOC has established programs of work release for those offenders who meet the standards established by departmental rules and regulations. There are strict requirements which must be met for participation in a work release program at an ATC. Inmates must work or go to school, or both, and return to the center when not occupied in an approved activity in the community. Inmates who are within 2 years of release and classified as minimum security can apply for placement at an ATC through their assigned correctional counselor. Approximately 49,000 adults are incarcerated in IDOC; therefore the agency is selective about who is transferred to ATCs.



As a victim of a crime, is there any information available from the department?

The Victims Services Unit will provide information, assistance and support to victims of crime whose victimizers are remanded to the custody or control of IDOC, and to victimized employees. These services will be administered with respect, compassion and confidentiality.

The Victim Services Unit will enhance victim's rights in Illinois through public forums, needed legislation, and joint efforts with other victim services agencies, departments and organizations.

The Victim Services Unit can be reached at: toll free 877-776-0755 or (217) 558-2200 ext. 4006.

More information can be found on the Victim Services website.



How can I be notified of the release, transfer, escape, death, or out-to-court appearance of an inmate who is incarcerated in the Illinois Department of Corrections?

You can register to receive notifications on any changes to an offender’s custody status through the AVN/VineLink website.

AVN/VineLink is a service available 24 hours a day, seven days a week to provide information about offender custody and case status and automatic notification (to those who register) of any change in status.

You can also contact the Victim Services Unit toll free at 877-776-0755 or (217) 558-2200 ext. 4006 to register for notifications.



How do I obtain medical information about an inmate currently incarcerated?

IDOC staff cannot discuss health care information about an inmate unless there is an Authorization for Release of Offender Medical Health Information or an Authorization for Release of Offender Mental Health signed by the offender on file. You may ask the offender to complete these forms and to submit them to the Health Care Unit where the offender is housed.



Where can I get information regarding sex offenders?

You can access the IDOC’s Parolee Sex Registrant Search link. The data pertains to only those offenders under parole supervision or mandatory supervised release from the Illinois Department of Corrections who are required to register as Sex Offenders per Illinois statute. Less than 2000 of the 18,000+ sex registrants in Illinois are under the supervision of the Illinois Department of Corrections. The address information is updated by the Parole Division of IDOC and may differ from that displayed on the Illinois State Police Sex Offender Registry web site at www.isp.state.il.us.

For additional information or assistance on sex offender registration contact the Attorney General’s Illinois Sex Offender Registry Team, 888-414-7678 (Voice/TTY) or the Illinois State Police Sex Offender Registry Unit.



How can an inmate being released to parole be approved to reside at my residence?


Inmates must have an approved residence before being released to parole. You can contact the facility in which the inmate is housed and ask to speak with Field Services. The facility phone numbers are under the All Facilities link.



How can a parolee be transferred to another state?


The agency’s Interstate Compact handles such inquiries. IDOC Interstate Compact can be reached at 217-558-2200 ext. 5100.



How do I report possible criminal behavior of a parolee or a parole absconder?


You can contact your local law enforcement and provide them the information. You can also contact the Illinois Department of Corrections at 217-558-2200 or fill out the Contact Us form on our website.



I am interested in a career with the Illinois Department of Corrections. How can I obtain more information?

Information about correctional officer positions can be found on the Careers at DOC webpage. All positions other positions available at IDOC are listed with the Illinois Department of Central Management Services (CMS).



How can I serve as a volunteer with the Illinois Department of Corrections?

At IDOC, volunteers assist in various ways, ranging from mentoring and meeting the religious needs of inmates to offering alcohol and drug rehabilitation such as Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous. Volunteers tutor, hold church services and Bible studies as well as parenting, art, music, poetry and literacy classes. At IDOC, thousands of volunteers provide programs and services that otherwise would not be available to the incarcerated men and women. Those interested in the Volunteer Services Program at IDOC can contact Marcy Morris, volunteer services manager, at 217-558-2200 ext. 6101.



What's the difference between a jail and a prison?

Jails are correctional facilities operated by the county or municipality.

Prisons are correctional facilities operated by the state or federal government.

The Illinois Department of Corrections is the state-operated prison system. IDOC incarcerates felons sentenced by the courts to the state’s prison system. County jails, municipal jails and federal prisons are separate entities.



http://www2.illinois.gov/idoc/aboutus/Pages/faq.aspx
Logged

Do not value the "things" you have in your life - value "who" you have in your life....



“Instead of thinking about what you're missing, try thinking about what you have that everyone else is missing.”
Pages: 1   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines

© 2006-2014 Illinois Prison Talk, All Rights Reserved
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS! Dilber MC Theme by HarzeM