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Author Topic: Will Every Inmate Be Eligible for Supplemental Sentence Credits?  (Read 83804 times)

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Offline TimeStandsStill

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Re: Will Every Inmate Be Eligible for Supplemental Sentence Credits?
« Reply #20 on: June 27, 2012, 10:09:46 PM »
I just noticed that the paragraph in bold below was added to the IDOC FAQ page:

What is Good Time?

There are three types of good time, however not all inmates are eligible for each type.

Statutory Good Time refers to the percentage of time an inmate must spend incarcerated. Inmates serve 50%, 75%, 85%, or 100% of their sentence.  This is determined by statute and is based on the offense that was committed.  Inmates may lose some of that good time based on their behavior while in custody.

Meritorious Good Time (MGT) and Supplemental Meritorious Good Time (SMGT) refer to the discretionary time (up to 180 days) that the director may grant to an eligible inmate based on his or her behavior while incarcerated. Please note that the award of meritorious good time is not automatic; it is at the discretion of the director.  Inmates convicted of certain offenses are not eligible for this type of good time credit.

The MGT/SMGT program was suspended in December of 2009 and terminated in January of 2010.  The program is currently under review.

Earned Good Conduct Credit refers to time earned by an inmate for participation in education, drug treatment or Illinois Correctional Industries programs. Again, not all inmates are eligible; inmates convicted of violent and Class X crimes are not eligible. Inmates earn one-half day off their sentence for each day of participation in such programs if they successfully complete the programs (Example: if an eligible inmate completes a drug treatment program that is 30-days in duration, he may be awarded 15-days off his sentence).

Please note: in accordance with Public Act 97-0697 (effective 6/22/2012) the above types of credit have been amended along with other changes.  The Department has started examining and identifying policies and/or rules for revisions that may need to be promulgated through the Joint Committee on Administrative Rules.

http://www2.illinois.gov/idoc/aboutus/Pages/faq.aspx

Offline RdRunner75

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Re: Will Every Inmate Be Eligible for Supplemental Sentence Credits?
« Reply #21 on: June 28, 2012, 01:28:29 AM »
I just noticed that the paragraph in bold below was added to the IDOC FAQ page:

What is Good Time?

There are three types of good time, however not all inmates are eligible for each type.

Statutory Good Time refers to the percentage of time an inmate must spend incarcerated. Inmates serve 50%, 75%, 85%, or 100% of their sentence.  This is determined by statute and is based on the offense that was committed.  Inmates may lose some of that good time based on their behavior while in custody.

Meritorious Good Time (MGT) and Supplemental Meritorious Good Time (SMGT) refer to the discretionary time (up to 180 days) that the director may grant to an eligible inmate based on his or her behavior while incarcerated. Please note that the award of meritorious good time is not automatic; it is at the discretion of the director.  Inmates convicted of certain offenses are not eligible for this type of good time credit.

The MGT/SMGT program was suspended in December of 2009 and terminated in January of 2010.  The program is currently under review.

Earned Good Conduct Credit refers to time earned by an inmate for participation in education, drug treatment or Illinois Correctional Industries programs. Again, not all inmates are eligible; inmates convicted of violent and Class X crimes are not eligible. Inmates earn one-half day off their sentence for each day of participation in such programs if they successfully complete the programs (Example: if an eligible inmate completes a drug treatment program that is 30-days in duration, he may be awarded 15-days off his sentence).

Please note: in accordance with Public Act 97-0697 (effective 6/22/2012) the above types of credit have been amended along with other changes.  The Department has started examining and identifying policies and/or rules for revisions that may need to be promulgated through the Joint Committee on Administrative Rules.

http://www2.illinois.gov/idoc/aboutus/Pages/faq.aspx

Thanks for sharing this. It's good to know the ball is starting to roll....  Btw, who is this Joint Committee?

Offline Forevermah

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Re: Will Every Inmate Be Eligible for Supplemental Sentence Credits?
« Reply #22 on: June 28, 2012, 06:43:48 AM »
Quote
Btw, who is this Joint Committee?



JOINT COMMITTEE ON ADMINISTRATIVE RULES - JCAR

The Joint Committee on Administrative Rules is a bipartisan legislative oversight committee created by the General Assembly in 1977.  Pursuant to the Illinois Administrative Procedure Act, the committee is authorized to conduct systematic reviews of administrative rules promulgated by state agencies.  The committee conducts several integrated review programs, including a review program for proposed, emergency and peremptory rulemaking, a review of new public acts and a complaint review program.

The committee is composed of 12 legislators who are appointed by the legislative leadership, and the membership is apportioned equally between the two houses and the two political parties.  Members serve two-year terms, and the committee is co-chaired by a member of each party and legislative house.  Support services for the committee are provided by 25 staff members.

Two purposes of the committee are to ensure that the Legislature is adequately informed of how laws are implemented through agency rulemaking and to facilitate public understanding of rules and regulations.  To that end, in addition to the review of new and existing rulemaking, the committee monitors legislation that affects rulemaking and conducts a public act review to alert agencies to the need for rulemaking.  The committee also publishes a weekly newsletter called The Flinn Report on this website to inform and educate Illinois citizens about current rulemaking activity and maintains the state's database for the Illinois Administrative Code and Illinois Register.
 



Here is the link to the Flinn Report:

http://www.ilga.gov/commission/jcar/flinn/flinn.asp
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Offline Forevermah

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Re: Will Every Inmate Be Eligible for Supplemental Sentence Credits?
« Reply #23 on: July 01, 2012, 09:01:52 AM »

Early release program may cause more inmates to take GED

2 hours ago  •  By Edith Brady-Lunny | eblunny@pantagraph.com


BLOOMINGTON — More McLean County Jail inmates may be interested in educational programs offered at the jail as a result of new legislation that restores a program for early release of Illinois inmates.

Gov. Pat Quinn has signed legislation to return good conduct credits of up to 180 days for nonviolent prisoners who serve at least 60 days in the Department of Corrections. The program, formerly known as Meritorious Good Time, was halted by the governor in 2009 after a controversy erupted over an adjustment to the program that gave some offenders 60 days credit when they entered prison.

A provision added to the overhauled legislation allows inmates to receive credit for programs they complete in the county jail before they are moved into the state prison system. In McLean County, that could translate to more defendants signing up for GED and life skills classes, said Sheriff Mike Emery.

“We expect to see a moderate increase in attendance among those being sentenced to prison,” said Emery.

Since January 2011, 27 jail inmates completed their high school equivalency certificates and another six are waiting for test results. Thirty-seven inmates have finished the eight-week life skills course that covers topics people in jail may have missed out on, such as basic computer skills, how to complete a job application, to prepare for an interview and how to balance a checkbook.

“If we can fill the classes with people who want to complete the GED program, it’s great. This new provision gives them an incentive to participate in educational programs,” said Emery.

The programs are open to all male and female inmates, including the majority who will be released without going to a state prison.  Funding for the GED instructors from Heartland Community College comes from the county’s general fund and inmate commissary money cover expenses for the life skills program taught by jail staff. 

Prison reform advocates are applauding the return of good conduct credits as a first step in addressing serious overcrowding issues that have steadily worsened since 2009.  A prison system designed to hold 34,000 prisoners has swollen to 48,000 since the end of MGT.

 “It’s not the silver bullet that solves the entire problem of overcrowding, but it’s really, really important,” said John Maki, director of the John Howard Association, a Chicago-based prison watchdog organization that has raised serious concerns about deplorable conditions in some state prisons .

As the prison population decreases, corrections staff may be able to turn its attention back to reform measures that Maki thinks were derailed with the pressure of dealing with 4,000 additional inmates.

“We’ve done this before. Illinois is able to find what’s safe, what will work and implement measures with accountability and transparency,” said Maki. Redeploy Illinois, a program to divert juvenile offenders from IDOC by providing services in their communities, is among those programs put in place three years ago.

How prison officials implement the new version of good conduct credit is important, noted Malcolm Young, director of the Program for Prison Reentry Strategies at the Northwestern School of Law’s Bluhm Legal Clinic.

“To have gotten past this log jam is a good thing. There’s hope for some relief to overcrowding. What happens next though, is important: revisiting sentencing policies; implementing Redeploy Illinois and other initiatives to sensibly punish law breakers; and for longer term and more serious prisoners, an array of programs and services that do make a difference,” said Young.

http://www.pantagraph.com/news/local/crime-and-courts/early-release-program-may-cause-more-inmates-to-take-ged/article_161c3f86-c311-11e1-b6a3-001a4bcf887a.html
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Offline jaf

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Re: Will Every Inmate Be Eligible for Supplemental Sentence Credits?
« Reply #24 on: July 01, 2012, 09:43:06 AM »
re. GED -  this is something I don't get.  I have a hundred questions!
From what I understand, anyone can go to a community college and enroll in GED classes free of charge. (I know that's the case locally, and I looked up a few other Illinois community colleges on the web and found that was also the case at all I looked up.)  So, there must be federal funding for it there, right?  I guess there must be some law or rule that says people in prison don't qualify for that free service? Or, does the community college just provide that service at their expense, which I kind of doubt? 
(I think people do have to pay a fee for the actual test, but I believe that there could be ways to pay for that, too - even if it is seeking donations from churches and or civic organizations.)

What other group of people could possibly benefit more from getting a GED more than those in prison?  It's not the answer to all their problems, but I believe it can be a life changer in more than one way.

Does anyone out there in IPT land know anything about the funding rules/laws?  Why they can't access the free clsses at community colleges?  Why does the funding for GED teachers have to come out of the DOC budget?  There are so many people on waiting lists for GED classes. 

AND - why can't they access more federal funds for Special Ed?  If people had an IEP, aren't they supposed to be able to get services until they reach an older age - 19? 21?  There are lots of guys in prison in that age range who probably qualify!

So many questions!  These are just a few. . .

Offline Forevermah

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Re: Will Every Inmate Be Eligible for Supplemental Sentence Credits?
« Reply #25 on: July 01, 2012, 09:47:10 AM »
Jaf, don't know if you have ever checked out Title 20,  SUBCHAPTER d: PROGRAMS AND SERVICES
PART 405 SCHOOL DISTRICT #428, but you might want to, you might get some answers to your questions  there:



http://www.ilga.gov/commission/jcar/admincode/020/02000405sections.html
Do not value the "things" you have in your life - value "who" you have in your life....



“Instead of thinking about what you're missing, try thinking about what you have that everyone else is missing.”

Offline jaf

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Re: Will Every Inmate Be Eligible for Supplemental Sentence Credits?
« Reply #26 on: July 01, 2012, 11:18:51 AM »
Jaf, don't know if you have ever checked out Title 20,  SUBCHAPTER d: PROGRAMS AND SERVICES
PART 405 SCHOOL DISTRICT #428, but you might want to, you might get some answers to your questions  there:



http://www.ilga.gov/commission/jcar/admincode/020/02000405sections.html

I'll get into that later - I've glanced at the whole thing, but not concentrated on that section, don't remember anything helpful there, (it'll probably just give me more questions!) . . . thanks for the reminder.

Offline jaf

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Re: Will Every Inmate Be Eligible for Supplemental Sentence Credits?
« Reply #27 on: July 02, 2012, 11:19:38 AM »
I reread it.  It just basically says the DOC has to provide some education to some people, then it says they don't HAVE TO in many cases, for many reasons. 
It doesn't talk about how it's funded.  The only funding issue noted is where offenders have to reimburse the DOC for the cost of some college classes.
Any other suggestions? 
I've asked representatives from a couple of disability agencies, but think I need to go higher.  I spoke with people at Equip for Equality, and the West Central Illinois Center for Independent Living.  Maybe I just need to ask my state Senator to help me get answers. Or maybe talk to the national GED organization? 

Offline Marks_guy

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Re: Will Every Inmate Be Eligible for Supplemental Sentence Credits?
« Reply #28 on: July 02, 2012, 12:19:32 PM »
I used to work at a college department that provided GED testing to prisons, so I can help answer some of your questions. Yes, many organizations provide free GED tutoring and testing. The tests and scoring, however, are not, and those organizations must absorb the costs. Additional costs come from being certified as a test administrator/proctor. Anyone can volunteer their time to tutor someone, but you have to be a certified GED Protcor to actually give the test. Those people do that for a living, so you have to add on their fees.

That's just for a random person on the outside. Now, you have to transition that to prisons. For security reasons, they are very selective about who they through the gates. Hence why they have actual teachers rather then volunteers. The department I worked for had to have its proctors specially evaluated and approved by DOC before they could come in, and they were often paid extra for going into a prison versus a local high school or community center.  So, the IDOC is paying a teacher to educate participants, then they are paying a special person to come give the test (with what could be called hazard pay), and then they are paying for the tests and scoring. That starts to add up really fast, considering the amount of tests being given.

Offline Forevermah

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Re: Will Every Inmate Be Eligible for Supplemental Sentence Credits?
« Reply #29 on: July 02, 2012, 01:40:59 PM »
Someone asked me in a PM if the IDOC has a time limit to implement a new program, I am answering them here so everyone can see (I don't answer PM's about goodtime) ....   the answer is NO, as long as it takes them, there is no time limit.

There is a lot to be done as mentioned previously in this topic!
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Offline jaf

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Re: Will Every Inmate Be Eligible for Supplemental Sentence Credits?
« Reply #30 on: July 02, 2012, 01:55:44 PM »
Thanks Marksguy,  it does help explain the extra costs of providing it in prisons.
 
But are you saying that the community colleges are absorbing all the costs or just the testing costs? 

Is there state or federal funding for any part of it? 


Offline Marks_guy

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Re: Will Every Inmate Be Eligible for Supplemental Sentence Credits?
« Reply #31 on: July 02, 2012, 03:41:06 PM »
Let me see if I can break this down. Basically, the GED classes and GED tests are two entirely different things. Anyone with the time, space, and knowledge can give free GED classes. They are, at the simplest level, tutoring sessions, like many schools offer to their students.

The test and the scoring are where the money comes in. There are some organizations that will absorb the cost of the test, but most charge a fee. Since I only gave the tests, I don't know what we charged for going into a prison to administer it, but we did get a quarterly check from the DOC.

I guess a good example of the difference would be the ACT/SAT tests for high schools kids. A child can get a free copy of a sample test or attend free study sessions at school, but you have to pay the money for the test itself.

But I'm willing to bet that the organizations that are absorbing the test costs are doing so either because it is built into their operating budget or have obtained donor/grant funding.

Offline jaf

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Re: Will Every Inmate Be Eligible for Supplemental Sentence Credits?
« Reply #32 on: July 02, 2012, 04:24:40 PM »
I understood that the two were separate, that's why I asked if the funding sources were different.   
I appreciate your responses.
I'm just trying to figure out if federal funds are available to provide GED classes, but they're withheld from people in prison.  If they are, it might be something to fight for.  I realize that prisoners lose rights, but this just doesn't seem like one they shoud lose.

Offline Marks_guy

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Re: Will Every Inmate Be Eligible for Supplemental Sentence Credits?
« Reply #33 on: July 02, 2012, 04:58:23 PM »
It's not a case of funds being purposely withheld. Community organizations (churches, centers, colleges, etc.) who absorb the costs of the test get that funding from somewhere, be it donations, operational budgets, or grants. I'm sure the IDOC could apply for grant money to help defer the costs of providing the GED (teachers, proctors, and the test itself).

Offline nicemom

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Re: Will Every Inmate Be Eligible for Supplemental Sentence Credits?
« Reply #34 on: July 10, 2012, 09:12:16 AM »
I sure hope they define who is eligable soon, hoping my son can benefit from this new program, hes been behaving and we are both praying he qualifies for something to get out a bit early hope these committes or whoever is working on this moves fast.

Offline TimeStandsStill

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Re: Will Every Inmate Be Eligible for Supplemental Sentence Credits?
« Reply #35 on: July 10, 2012, 09:17:16 AM »
We all are hoping and praying for the same thing for our LOs nicemom but we just have to sit tight and be patient and wait.  I know it's frustrating but there's nothing else we can do at this point.  Hang in there.


Offline Ellie4533

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Re: Will Every Inmate Be Eligible for Supplemental Sentence Credits?
« Reply #36 on: July 10, 2012, 09:49:01 AM »
My son is at East Moline and scheduled to get out August 25, 2012 so really August 24 th this year.They dont release on weekends and dont want to pay him to stay there LOL.But I called East Moline and asked how will this work and will I just all of a sudden get a call to come and get him no notice.They said they have nothing yet and that she knew it requires 2 weeks notice to the state before they release and that they will have to train first before they start releasing inmates.Most likely my son would be out before it all went into effect but I would have at least 2 weeks to know.I hope and pray this helps allot of people here and their loved ones will come home sooner. But Im still excited that my son will be home real soon anyways and he can start his life over and build from there.

Offline Forevermah

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Re: Will Every Inmate Be Eligible for Supplemental Sentence Credits?
« Reply #37 on: July 10, 2012, 10:17:32 AM »
My son is at East Moline and scheduled to get out August 25, 2012 so really August 24 th this year.They dont release on weekends and dont want to pay him to stay there LOL.But I called East Moline and asked how will this work and will I just all of a sudden get a call to come and get him no notice.They said they have nothing yet and that she knew it requires 2 weeks notice to the state before they release and that they will have to train first before they start releasing inmates.Most likely my son would be out before it all went into effect but I would have at least 2 weeks to know.I hope and pray this helps allot of people here and their loved ones will come home sooner. But Im still excited that my son will be home real soon anyways and he can start his life over and build from there.

Be sure you are signed up for VINE so that you get your notice two weeks before he is going to be released. 

The two week notice is to the state for any inmate that is being released EARLY under a new program, which has not started yet.  Their names and ID #'s also go on the list for Early Release posted on the IDOC website.  This list was started after the original MGT program was stopped. 

Glad to hear your son will be out soon!  The best to him and you.
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Offline meangene

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Re: Will Every Inmate Be Eligible for Supplemental Sentence Credits?
« Reply #38 on: July 10, 2012, 11:04:44 AM »
When my sons were to be released on a weekend, they were always released on the Friday prior to the week end day because they can not by law keep them past their release date, (but there may be extenuating circumstances of which i am not aware).  The guys would call to let me know and make sure I was there at 8 on the dot or 7 or whatever time they were given by the facilities and to make sure I brought clothes so they could change at the first gas station we came across.

Offline Ellie4533

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Re: Will Every Inmate Be Eligible for Supplemental Sentence Credits?
« Reply #39 on: July 10, 2012, 12:34:40 PM »
I am on the vine notification will that give the two week notice to? I am going to pick him up but I do work and I work allot sometimes 16 hour days so I would like the notice so I can plan my schedule. And one more thing I was told they do not release on weekends but if the release date falls on a saturday they would pay them $100 per day past that? The counseler said thats why he will be released on friday. :wc38: