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Author Topic: Mail Restriction  (Read 12132 times)

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Offline Wolf | Lover

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Mail Restriction
« on: September 07, 2006, 12:15:19 PM »
Does anyone know the IDOC procedure for inmate mail restriction as follows:

a) an inmate to block incoming mail from specific individual(s)
b) a specific individual(s) to block outgoing mail from an inmate

Offline jewels

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Re: Mail Restriction
« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2006, 12:39:31 PM »
For someone outside to block inmate mail, they just need to write a letter to the prison requesting precisely that. I suppose it would work the same way for an inmate to block outside mail, that he/she would write to the warden or mail room about it.

Offline dancer

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Re: Mail Restriction
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2006, 07:32:38 PM »
I would think you could write REFUSED on the letter and send it back unopened, RTS  also.  That would get the message across.  I would think it would be hard for the prison to catch incoming mail that an inmate didn't want. 

Offline Wolf | Lover

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Re: Mail Restriction
« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2006, 04:12:25 AM »
Thanks for the replies.

Does the letter in either situation have to be notarized?
If so, do inmates have the ability to get such a letter notarized inside?

If it doesn't have to be notarized, how does the prison ensure its a legit request and not someone trying to mess with an inmate's outgoing mail by falsifyng such a letter through impersonating someone the inmate writes in an attempt to try and block mail?  (ie: a vengeful ex-wife wanting to block her inmate ex-husband from communicating with a family member?)

Offline Scout

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Re: Mail Restriction
« Reply #4 on: September 08, 2006, 05:21:35 AM »
I think they can set something up through their counselor, let me ask G tongiht and I'll let you know what he says.
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Offline dancer

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Re: Mail Restriction
« Reply #5 on: September 08, 2006, 09:56:20 AM »
Inmates can get letters notarized,  because things like affidavits must be notarized.  You don't need to notarize a letter to the warden or prison saying you don't want mail from a certain person though.   I hate to go to the prison with a problem,  if I can handle it myself.  There was one penpal who was weird,  and pulled some crap.  I wrote him one letter "never write me again" and he did not.  E told me if you specifically  tell an inmate not to write you,  and they ignore it,  they  will get in trouble.
I have no idea how you prevent a person from falsifying a request like that!  Is that what happened?   Maybe if a person who is blocked,  and doesn't want to be,  or shouldn't be,  they would need to have an attorney write the prison. Has this already happened? 

Offline Scout

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Re: Mail Restriction
« Reply #6 on: September 09, 2006, 07:27:32 AM »
I asked G last night and he said that there's no way an inmate can refuse mail from someone, but anyone can contact the prison and block mail from a prisoner.
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It's difficult to have a battle of wits with unarmed individuals.

Offline jewels

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Re: Mail Restriction
« Reply #7 on: September 09, 2006, 08:11:21 AM »
So basically anyone who is anyone, can block mail from the inmate, but he/she has to have all mail delivered to him/her. That just isn't fair, but what in life is? I wonder if an inmate wrote to the warden if they would stop any unwanted mail? I know that some prisons, not all, log mail.

Offline Tessa

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Re: Mail Restriction
« Reply #8 on: September 09, 2006, 09:05:24 AM »
Just my opinion.... If the daughter is 18, she can do what she wants to do. Is there a PATERNAL Aunt, Uncle or Grandparent that will accept mail from Dad and hold it for the daughter?

Tessa

Offline Jims

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Re: Mail Restriction
« Reply #9 on: September 09, 2006, 04:58:01 PM »
She could always get a P.O. box for a nominal fee.
What's done to children, they will do to society.  ~Karl Menninger

Offline Wolf | Lover

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Re: Mail Restriction
« Reply #10 on: September 10, 2006, 08:07:49 AM »
You're right Jewels, it seems unfair. I mean how do inmates that receive hate mail ever get it to stop then?

I'll certainly pass on the good suggestions, and I'd like to think they've considered extended family or P.O. Box as alternatives, but we'll see. I have no idea of the daughter's economic situation to even afford a nominal private box, other than that she still lives at home with the ex-wife.

However, wouldn't the block be by name not mailing address? I guess a lot would ride on the daughter actually investigating why her Dad hasn't responded if the Mother does fake a letter, or him trying to reach his daughter through extended family if he has any contact with them, or worse case, the daughter not wanting to jeopardize her relationship with her Mother & their living arrangement at present either.

I couldn't gather much more than the question I was asked to seek out possible answers for.

Thanks for all the replies though, this is helpful. Every possible solution is a step towards resolution!

Offline jewels

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Re: Mail Restriction
« Reply #11 on: September 10, 2006, 09:09:28 AM »
It would be up to the person involved to keep the prison updated on their address. I wonder how many inmates do get hate mail? He could always try writing  Mail supervisor I guess. There must be a way around this for him too.

Offline Bunny1984

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Re: Mail Restriction
« Reply #12 on: May 03, 2014, 08:34:41 AM »
Does anyone know if my l/o can send or receive mail during a lockdown?

Offline zachsmom

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Re: Mail Restriction
« Reply #13 on: May 03, 2014, 09:10:26 AM »
Inmates can send & receive mail at all times. The only thing that could stop the inmate from writing would be if they were out of write outs.